Screen 1 of 17

State Plan for the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program
and
State Plan Supplement for the State Supported Employment Services Program

California Department of Rehabilitation State Plan for Fiscal Year 2010 (submitted FY 2009)

Table of Contents

Preprint
 

Attachment 4.2(c)
Input of State Rehabilitation Council [1]

Attachment 4.7(b)(3)
Request for Waiver of Statewideness [2]

Attachment 4.8(b)(1)
Cooperative Agreements with Agencies Not Carrying Out Activities Under the Statewide Workforce Investment System [3]

Attachment 4.8(b)(2)
Coordination with Education Officials [3]

Attachment 4.8(b)(3)
Cooperative Agreements with Private Nonprofit Organizations [3]

Attachment 4.8(b)(4)
Arrangements and Cooperative Agreements for the Provision of Supported Employment Services [3]

Attachment 4.10
Comprehensive System of Personnel Development [4]

Attachment 4.11(a)
Statewide Assessment [3]

Attachment 4.11(b)
Annual Estimates [4]

Attachment 4.11(c)(1)
State Goals and Priorities [3]

Attachment 4.11(c)(3)
Order of Selection [5]

Attachment 4.11(c)(4)
Goals and Plans for Distribution of Title VI, Part B Funds [4]

Attachment 4.11(d)
State's Strategies [3]

Attachment 4.11(e)(2)
Evaluation and Reports of Progress [4]

Attachment 6.3
Quality, Scope, and Extent of Supported Employment Services [3]

Footnotes

[1]
Required annually except for agencies that are independent commissions do not provide this attachment.

[2]
Required only of agencies requesting, or previously granted, a Waiver of Statewideness.

[3]
The following attachments should be submitted whenever the information needs to be updated.

[4]
The following attachments require annual updating and must be submitted each year.

[5]
Required Annually for All Agencies on an Order of Selection

Screen 2 of 17

State Plan for the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program
and
State Plan Supplement for the State Supported Employment Services Program

California Department of Rehabilitation State Plan for Fiscal Year 2010 (submitted FY 2009)

Section 1: State Certifications

1.1 The (enter the name of designated state agency or designated state unit below)...

California Department of Rehabilitation

... is authorized to submit this State Plan under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended [1] and its supplement under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act [2].

1.2 As a condition for the receipt of federal funds under Title I, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act for the provision of vocational rehabilitation services, the... (enter the name of the designated state agency below ) [3]

California Department of Rehabilitation

... agrees to operate and administer the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program in accordance with the provisions of this State Plan [4], the Rehabilitation Act, and all applicable regulations [5], policies and procedures established by the secretary. Funds made available under Section 111 of the Rehabilitation Act are used solely for the provision of vocational rehabilitation services under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act and the administration of the State Plan for the vocational rehabilitation services program.

1.3 As a condition for the receipt of federal funds under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act for supported employment services, the designated state agency agrees to operate and administer the State Supported Employment Services Program in accordance with the provisions of the supplement to this State Plan [6], the Rehabilitation Act and all applicable regulations [7], policies and procedures established by the secretary. Funds made available under Title VI, Part B, are used solely for the provision of supported employment services and the administration of the supplement to the Title I State Plan.
Yes

1.4 The designated state agency and/or the designated state unit has the authority under state law to perform the functions of the state regarding this State Plan and its supplement.
Yes

1.5 The state legally may carry out each provision of the State Plan and its supplement.
Yes

1.6 All provisions of the State Plan and its supplement are consistent with state law.
Yes

1.7 The (enter title of state officer below)
Yes

Director of the Department of Rehabilitation

... has the authority under state law to receive, hold and disburse federal funds made available under this State Plan and its supplement.

1.8 The (enter title of state officer below)...
Yes

Director of the Department of Rehabilitation

... has the authority to submit this State Plan for vocational rehabilitation services and the State Plan supplement for supported employment services.

1.9 The agency that submits this State Plan and its supplement has adopted or otherwise formally approved the plan and its supplement.
Yes

State Plan Certified By

As the authorized signatory identified above, I hereby certify that I will sign, date and retain in the files of the designated state agency/designated state unit Section 1 of the Preprint, and separate Certification of Lobbying forms (Form ED-80-0013; available at http://www.ed.gov/programs/8003/assurancesed80013.doc) for both the vocational rehabilitation and supported employment programs.

Signed?
Yes

Name of Signatory
Anthony Tony P. Sauer EMMDS

Title of Signatory
Director

Date Signed (mm/dd/yyyy)
06/30/2009

Assurances Certified By

The designated state agency and/or the designated state unit provide the following assurance(s) in connection with the approval of the State Plan for FY 2010
 

Comments:

Signed?

Name of Signatory

Title of Signatory

Date Signed (mm/dd/yyyy)

* The signatory of the assurance with the authority to execute and submit the State Plan will maintain a signed copy of the assurance(s) with the signed State Plan.

Section 1 Footnotes

[1] Public Law 93 112, as amended by Public Laws 93 516, 95 602, 98 221, 99 506, 100-630, 102-569, 103-073, and 105-220.

[2] Unless otherwise stated, "Rehabilitation Act" means the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended.

[3] All references in this plan to "designated state agency" or to "the state agency" relate to the agency identified in this paragraph.

[4] No funds under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act may be awarded without an approved State Plan in accordance with Section 101(a) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR part 361.

[5] Applicable regulations include the Education Department General Administrative Regulations (EDGAR) in 34 CFR Parts 74, 76, 77, 79, 80, 81, 82, 85 and 86 and the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program regulations in 34 CFR Part 361.

[6] No funds under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act may be awarded without an approved supplement to the Title I State Plan in accordance with Section 625(a) of the Rehabilitation Act.

[7] Applicable regulations include the EDGAR citations in footnote 5, 34 CFR Part 361, and 34 CFR Part 363.

Section 2: Public Comment on State Plan Policies and Procedures

2.1 Public participation requirements. (Section 101(a)(16)(A) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.10(d), .20(a), (b), (d); and 363.11(g)(9))

(a) Conduct of public meetings.

The designated state agency, prior to the adoption of any substantive policies or procedures governing the provision of vocational rehabilitation services under the State Plan and supported employment services under the supplement to the State Plan, including making any substantive amendments to the policies and procedures, conducts public meetings throughout the state to provide the public, including individuals with disabilities, an opportunity to comment on the policies or procedures.

(b) Notice requirements.

The designated state agency, prior to conducting the public meetings, provides appropriate and sufficient notice throughout the state of the meetings in accordance with state law governing public meetings or, in the absence of state law governing public meetings, procedures developed by the state agency in consultation with the State Rehabilitation Council, if the agency has a council.

(c) Special consultation requirements.

The state agency actively consults with the director of the Client Assistance Program, the State Rehabilitation Council, if the agency has a council and, as appropriate, Indian tribes, tribal organizations and native Hawaiian organizations on its policies and procedures governing the provision of vocational rehabilitation services under the State Plan and supported employment services under the supplement to the State Plan.

Section 3: Submission of the State Plan and its Supplement

3.1 Submission and revisions of the State Plan and its supplement. (Sections 101(a)(1), (23) and 625(a)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act; Section 501 of the Workforce Investment Act; 34 CFR 76.140; 361.10(e), (f), and (g); and 363.10)

(a) The state submits to the commissioner of the Rehabilitation Services Administration the State Plan and its supplement on the same date that the state submits either a State Plan under Section 112 of the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 or a state unified plan under Section 501 of that Rehabilitation Act.
(b) The state submits only those policies, procedures or descriptions required under this State Plan and its supplement that have not been previously submitted to and approved by the commissioner.
(c) The state submits to the commissioner, at such time and in such manner as the commissioner determines to be appropriate, reports containing annual updates of the information relating to the:

  1. comprehensive system of personnel development;
  2. assessments, estimates, goals and priorities, and reports of progress;
  3. innovation and expansion activities; and
  4. other updates of information required under Title I, Part B, or Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act that are requested by the commissioner.

(d) The State Plan and its supplement are in effect subject to the submission of modifications the state determines to be necessary or the commissioner requires based on a change in state policy, a change in federal law, including regulations, an interpretation of the Rehabilitation Act by a federal court or the highest court of the state, or a finding by the commissioner of state noncompliance with the requirements of the Rehabilitation Act, 34 CFR 361 or 34 CFR 363.

3.2 Supported Employment State Plan supplement. (Sections 101(a)(22) and 625(a) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.34 and 363.10)

(a) The state has an acceptable plan for carrying out Part B, of Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act that provides for the use of funds under that part to supplement funds made available under Part B, of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act for the cost of services leading to supported employment.
(b) The Supported Employment State Plan, including any needed annual revisions, is submitted as a supplement to the State Plan.

Section 4: Administration of the State Plan

4.1 Designated state agency and designated state unit. (Section 101(a)(2) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.13(a) and (b))

(a) Designated state agency.

  1. There is a state agency designated as the sole state agency to administer the State Plan or to supervise its administration in a political subdivision of the state by a sole local agency.

  1. The designated state agency is:

  1. X a state agency that is primarily concerned with vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities; or

  1. a state agency that is not primarily concerned with vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities and includes a vocational rehabilitation unit as provided in paragraph (b) of this section.

  1. In American Samoa, the designated state agency is the governor.

(b) Designated state unit.

  1. If the designated state agency is not primarily concerned with vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities, in accordance with subparagraph 4.1(a)(2)(B) of this section, the state agency includes a vocational rehabilitation bureau, division or unit that:

  1. is primarily concerned with vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities and is responsible for the administration of the designated state agency's vocational rehabilitation program under the State Plan;
  2. has a full-time director;
  3. has a staff, at least 90 percent of whom are employed full-time on the rehabilitation work of the organizational unit; and
  4. is located at an organizational level and has an organizational status within the designated state agency comparable to that of other major organizational units of the designated state agency.

  1. The name of the designated state vocational rehabilitation unit is
California Department of Rehabilitation

4.2 State independent commission or State Rehabilitation Council. (Sections 101(a)(21) and 105 of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.16 and .17)

The State Plan must contain one of the following assurances.

(a) The designated state agency is an independent state commission that:

  1. is responsible under state law for operating or overseeing the operation of the vocational rehabilitation program in the state and is primarily concerned with the vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities in accordance with subparagraph 4.1(a)(2)(A) of this section.

  1. is consumer controlled by persons who:
    1. are individuals with physical or mental impairments that substantially limit major life activities; and
    2. represent individuals with a broad range of disabilities, unless the designated state unit under the direction of the commission is the state agency for individuals who are blind;

  1. includes family members, advocates or other representatives of individuals with mental impairments; and

  1. undertakes the functions set forth in Section 105(c)(4) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.17(h)(4).

or

(b) X The state has established a State Rehabilitation Council that meets the criteria set forth in Section 105 of the Rehabilitation Act, 34 CFR 361.17 and the designated state unit

  1. jointly with the State Rehabilitation Council develops, agrees to and reviews annually state goals and priorities and jointly submits to the commissioner annual reports of progress in accordance with the provisions of Section 101(a)(15) of the Rehabilitation Act, 34 CFR 361.29 and subsection 4.11 of this State Plan;

  1. regularly consults with the State Rehabilitation Council regarding the development, implementation and revision of state policies and procedures of general applicability pertaining to the provision of vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. includes in the State Plan and in any revision to the State Plan a summary of input provided by the State Rehabilitation Council, including recommendations from the annual report of the council described in Section 105(c)(5) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.17(h)(5), the review and analysis of consumer satisfaction described in Section 105(c)(4) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.17(h)(4), and other reports prepared by the council and the response of the designated state unit to the input and recommendations, including explanations for rejecting any input or recommendation; and

  1. transmits to the council:
    1. all plans, reports and other information required under 34 CFR 361 to be submitted to the commissioner;
    2. all policies and information on all practices and procedures of general applicability provided to or used by rehabilitation personnel in carrying out this State Plan and its supplement; and
    3. copies of due process hearing decisions issued under 34 CFR 361.57, which are transmitted in such a manner as to ensure that the identity of the participants in the hearings is kept confidential.

(c) If the designated state unit has a State Rehabilitation Council, Attachment 4.2(c) provides a summary of the input provided by the council consistent with the provisions identified in subparagraph (b)(3) of this section; the response of the designated state unit to the input and recommendations; and, explanations for the rejection of any input or any recommendation.

4.3 Consultations regarding the administration of the State Plan. (Section 101(a)(16)(B) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.21)

The designated state agency takes into account, in connection with matters of general policy arising in the administration of the plan and its supplement, the views of:

(a) individuals and groups of individuals who are recipients of vocational rehabilitation services or, as appropriate, the individuals' representatives;
(b) personnel working in programs that provide vocational rehabilitation services to individuals with disabilities;
(c) providers of vocational rehabilitation services to individuals with disabilities;
(d) the director of the Client Assistance Program; and
(e) the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has a council.

4.4 Nonfederal share. (Sections 7(14) and 101(a)(3) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 80.24 and 361.60)

The nonfederal share of the cost of carrying out this State Plan is 21.3 percent and is provided through the financial participation by the state or, if the state elects, by the state and local agencies.

4.5 Local administration. (Sections 7(24) and 101(a)(2)(A) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.5(b)(47) and .15)

The State Plan provides for the administration of the plan by a local agency. No

If "Yes", the designated state agency:

(a) ensures that each local agency is under the supervision of the designated state unit with the sole local agency, as that term is defined in Section 7(24) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.5(b)(47), responsible for the administration of the vocational rehabilitation program within the political subdivision that it serves; and
(b) develops methods that each local agency will use to administer the vocational rehabilitation program in accordance with the State Plan.

4.6 Shared funding and administration of joint programs. (Section 101(a)(2)(A)(ii) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.27)

The State Plan provides for the state agency to share funding and administrative responsibility with another state agency or local public agency to carry out a joint program to provide services to individuals with disabilities. No

If "Yes", the designated state agency submits to the commissioner for approval a plan that describes its shared funding and administrative arrangement. The plan must include:

(a) a description of the nature and scope of the joint program;
(b) the services to be provided under the joint program;
(c) the respective roles of each participating agency in the administration and provision of services; and
(d) the share of the costs to be assumed by each agency.

4.7 Statewideness and waivers of statewideness. (Section 101(a)(4) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.25, .26, and .60(b)(3)(i) and (ii))

___ This agency is not requesting a waiver of statewideness.

(a) Services provided under the State Plan are available in all political subdivisions of the state.
(b) The state unit may provide services in one or more political subdivisions of the state that increase services or expand the scope of services that are available statewide under this State Plan if the:

  1. nonfederal share of the cost of these services is met from funds provided by a local public agency, including funds contributed to a local public agency by a private agency, organization or individual;

  1. services are likely to promote the vocational rehabilitation of substantially larger numbers of individuals with disabilities or of individuals with disabilities with particular types of impairments; and

  1. state, for purposes other than the establishment of a community rehabilitation program or the construction of a particular facility for community rehabilitation program purposes, requests in Attachment 4.7(b)(3) a waiver of the statewideness requirement in accordance with the following requirements:

  1. identification of the types of services to be provided;

  1. written assurance from the local public agency that it will make available to the state unit the nonfederal share of funds;

  1. written assurance that state unit approval will be obtained for each proposed service before it is put into effect; and

  1. written assurance that all other State Plan requirements, including a state's order of selection, will apply to all services approved under the waiver.

(c) Contributions, consistent with the requirements of 34 CFR 361.60(b)(3)(ii), by private entities of earmarked funds for particular geographic areas within the state may be used as part of the nonfederal share without the state requesting a waiver of the statewideness requirement provided that the state notifies the commissioner that it cannot provide the full nonfederal share without using the earmarked funds.

4.8 Cooperation, collaboration and coordination. (Sections 101(a)(11), (24)(B), and 625(b)(4) and (5) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.22, .23, .24, and .31, and 363.11(e))

(a) Cooperative agreements with other components of statewide work force investment system.

The designated state agency or the designated state unit has cooperative agreements with other entities that are components of the statewide work force investment system and replicates those agreements at the local level between individual offices of the designated state unit and local entities carrying out the One-Stop service delivery system or other activities through the statewide work force investment system.

(b) Cooperation and coordination with other agencies and entities.

Attachment 4.8(b) (1)-(4) describes the designated state agency's:

  1. cooperation with and use of the services and facilities of the federal, state, and local agencies and programs, including programs carried out by the undersecretary for Rural Development of the United States Department of Agriculture and state use contracting programs, to the extent that those agencies and programs are not carrying out activities through the statewide work force investment system;

  1. coordination, in accordance with the requirements of paragraph 4.8(c) of this section, with education officials to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities from school to the receipt of vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. establishment of cooperative agreements with private nonprofit vocational rehabilitation service providers, in accordance with the requirements of paragraph 5.10(b) of the State Plan; and,

  1. efforts to identify and make arrangements, including entering into cooperative agreements, with other state agencies and entities with respect to the provision of supported employment and extended services for individuals with the most significant disabilities, in accordance with the requirements of subsection 6.5 of the supplement to this State Plan.

(c) Coordination with education officials.

  1. Attachment 4.8(b)(2) describes the plans, policies and procedures for coordination between the designated state agency and education officials responsible for the public education of students with disabilities that are designed to facilitate the transition of the students who are individuals with disabilities from the receipt of educational services in school to the receipt of vocational rehabilitation services under the responsibility of the designated state agency.

  1. The State Plan description must:

  1. provide for the development and approval of an individualized plan for employment in accordance with 34 CFR 361.45 as early as possible during the transition planning process but, at the latest, before each student determined to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services leaves the school setting or if the designated state unit is operating on an order of selection before each eligible student able to be served under the order leaves the school setting; and

  1. include information on a formal interagency agreement with the state educational agency that, at a minimum, provides for:

  1. consultation and technical assistance to assist educational agencies in planning for the transition of students with disabilities from school to postschool activities, including vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. transition planning by personnel of the designated state agency and the educational agency for students with disabilities that facilitates the development and completion of their individualized education programs under Section 614(d) of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act;

  1. roles and responsibilities, including financial responsibilities, of each agency, including provisions for determining state lead agencies and qualified personnel responsible for transition services; and

  1. procedures for outreach to students with disabilities as early as possible during the transition planning process and identification of students with disabilities who need transition services.

(d) Coordination with statewide independent living council and independent living centers.

The designated state unit, the Statewide Independent Living Council established under Section 705 of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 364, and the independent living centers described in Part C of Title VII of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 366 have developed working relationships and coordinate their activities.

(e) Cooperative agreement with recipients of grants for services to American Indians.

  1. X There is in the state a recipient(s) of a grant under Part C of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act for the provision of vocational rehabilitation services for American Indians who are individuals with disabilities residing on or near federal and state reservations.

  1. If "Yes", the designated state agency has entered into a formal cooperative agreement that meets the following requirements with each grant recipient in the state that receives funds under Part C of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act:

  1. strategies for interagency referral and information sharing that will assist in eligibility determinations and the development of individualized plans for employment;

  1. procedures for ensuring that American Indians who are individuals with disabilities and are living near a reservation or tribal service area are provided vocational rehabilitation services; and

  1. provisions for sharing resources in cooperative studies and assessments, joint training activities, and other collaborative activities designed to improve the provision of services to American Indians who are individuals with disabilities.

4.9 Methods of administration. (Section 101(a)(6) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.12, .19 and .51(a) and (b))

(a) In general.

The state agency employs methods of administration, including procedures to ensure accurate data collection and financial accountability, found by the commissioner to be necessary for the proper and efficient administration of the plan and for carrying out all the functions for which the state is responsible under the plan and 34 CFR 361.

(b) Employment of individuals with disabilities.

The designated state agency and entities carrying out community rehabilitation programs in the state, who are in receipt of assistance under Part B, of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act and this State Plan, take affirmative action to employ and advance in employment qualified individuals with disabilities covered under and on the same terms and conditions as set forth in Section 503 of the Rehabilitation Act.

(c) Facilities.

Any facility used in connection with the delivery of services assisted under this State Plan meets program accessibility requirements consistent with the provisions, as applicable, of the Architectural Barriers Rehabilitation Act of 1968, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and the regulations implementing these laws.

4.10 Comprehensive system of personnel development. (Section 101(a)(7) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.18)

Attachment 4.10 describes the designated state agency's procedures and activities to establish and maintain a comprehensive system of personnel development designed to ensure an adequate supply of qualified state rehabilitation professional and paraprofessional personnel for the designated state unit. The description includes the following:

(a) Data system on personnel and personnel development.

Development and maintenance of a system for collecting and analyzing on an annual basis data on qualified personnel needs and personnel development with respect to:

  1. Qualified personnel needs.

  1. The number of personnel who are employed by the state agency in the provision of vocational rehabilitation services in relation to the number of individuals served, broken down by personnel category;

  1. The number of personnel currently needed by the state agency to provide vocational rehabilitation services, broken down by personnel category; and

  1. Projections of the number of personnel, broken down by personnel category, who will be needed by the state agency to provide vocational rehabilitation services in the state in five years based on projections of the number of individuals to be served, including individuals with significant disabilities, the number of personnel expected to retire or leave the field, and other relevant factors.

  1. Personnel development.

  1. A list of the institutions of higher education in the state that are preparing vocational rehabilitation professionals, by type of program;

  1. The number of students enrolled at each of those institutions, broken down by type of program; and

  1. The number of students who graduated during the prior year from each of those institutions with certification or licensure, or with the credentials for certification or licensure, broken down by the personnel category for which they have received, or have the credentials to receive, certification or licensure.

(b) Plan for recruitment, preparation and retention of qualified personnel.

Development, updating on an annual basis, and implementation of a plan to address the current and projected needs for qualified personnel based on the data collection and analysis system described in paragraph (a) of this subsection and that provides for the coordination and facilitation of efforts between the designated state unit and institutions of higher education and professional associations to recruit, prepare and retain personnel who are qualified in accordance with paragraph (c) of this subsection, including personnel from minority backgrounds and personnel who are individuals with disabilities.

(c) Personnel standards.

Policies and procedures for the establishment and maintenance of personnel standards to ensure that designated state unit professional and paraprofessional personnel are appropriately and adequately prepared and trained, including:

  1. standards that are consistent with any national- or state-approved or recognized certification, licensing, registration, or, in the absence of these requirements, other comparable requirements (including state personnel requirements) that apply to the profession or discipline in which such personnel are providing vocational rehabilitation services.

  1. To the extent that existing standards are not based on the highest requirements in the state applicable to a particular profession or discipline, the steps the state is currently taking and the steps the state plans to take in accordance with the written plan to retrain or hire personnel within the designated state unit to meet standards that are based on the highest requirements in the state, including measures to notify designated state unit personnel, the institutions of higher education identified in subparagraph (a)(2), and other public agencies of these steps and the time lines for taking each step.

  1. The written plan required by subparagraph (c)(2) describes the following:

  1. specific strategies for retraining, recruiting and hiring personnel;

  1. the specific time period by which all state unit personnel will meet the standards required by subparagraph (c)(1);

  1. procedures for evaluating the designated state unit's progress in hiring or retraining personnel to meet applicable personnel standards within the established time period; and

  1. the identification of initial minimum qualifications that the designated state unit will require of newly hired personnel when the state unit is unable to hire new personnel who meet the established personnel standards and the identification of a plan for training such individuals to meet the applicable standards within the time period established for all state unit personnel to meet the established personnel standards.

(d) Staff development.

Policies, procedures and activities to ensure that all personnel employed by the designated state unit receive appropriate and adequate training. The narrative describes the following:

  1. A system of staff development for professionals and paraprofessionals within the designated state unit, particularly with respect to assessment, vocational counseling, job placement and rehabilitation technology.

  1. Procedures for the acquisition and dissemination to designated state unit professionals and paraprofessionals significant knowledge from research and other sources.

(e) Personnel to address individual communication needs.

Availability of personnel within the designated state unit or obtaining the services of other individuals who are able to communicate in the native language of applicants or eligible individuals who have limited English speaking ability or in appropriate modes of communication with applicants or eligible individuals.

(f) Coordination of personnel development under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act.

Procedures and activities to coordinate the designated state unit's comprehensive system of personnel development with personnel development under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act.

4.11. Statewide assessment; annual estimates; annual state goals and priorities; strategies; and progress reports.

(Sections 101(a)(15), 105(c)(2) and 625(b)(2) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.17(h)(2), .29, and 363.11(b))

(a) Comprehensive statewide assessment.

  1. Attachment 4.11(a) documents the results of a comprehensive, statewide assessment, jointly conducted every three years by the designated state unit and the State Rehabilitation Council (if the state has such a council). The assessment describes:

  1. the rehabilitation needs of individuals with disabilities residing within the state, particularly the vocational rehabilitation services needs of:

  1. individuals with the most significant disabilities, including their need for supported employment services;

  1. individuals with disabilities who are minorities and individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program carried out under this State Plan; and

  1. individuals with disabilities served through other components of the statewide work force investment system.

  1. The need to establish, develop or improve community rehabilitation programs within the state.

  1. For any year in which the state updates the assessments, the designated state unit submits to the commissioner a report containing information regarding updates to the assessments.

(b) Annual estimates.

Attachment 4.11(b) identifies on an annual basis state estimates of the:

  1. number of individuals in the state who are eligible for services under the plan;

  1. number of eligible individuals who will receive services provided with funds provided under Part B of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act and under Part B of Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act, including, if the designated state agency uses an order of selection in accordance with subparagraph 5.3(b)(2) of this State Plan, estimates of the number of individuals to be served under each priority category within the order; and

  1. costs of the services described in subparagraph (b)(1), including, if the designated state agency uses an order of selection, the service costs for each priority category within the order.

(c) Goals and priorities.

  1. Attachment 4.11(c)(1) identifies the goals and priorities of the state that are jointly developed or revised, as applicable, with and agreed to by the State Rehabilitation Council, if the agency has a council, in carrying out the vocational rehabilitation and supported employment programs.

  1. The designated state agency submits to the commissioner a report containing information regarding any revisions in the goals and priorities for any year the state revises the goals and priorities.

  1. Order of selection.
    If the state agency implements an order of selection, consistent with subparagraph 5.3(b)(2) of the State Plan, Attachment 4.11(c)(3):

  1. shows the order to be followed in selecting eligible individuals to be provided vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. provides a justification for the order; and

  1. identifies the service and outcome goals, and the time within which these goals may be achieved for individuals in each priority category within the order.

  1. Goals and plans for distribution of Title VI, Part B, funds.
    Attachment 4.11(c)(4) specifies, consistent with subsection 6.4 of the State Plan supplement, the state's goals and priorities with respect to the distribution of funds received under Section 622 of the Rehabilitation Act for the provision of supported employment services.

(d) Strategies.

  1. Attachment 4.11(d) describes the strategies, including:

  1. the methods to be used to expand and improve services to individuals with disabilities, including how a broad range of assistive technology services and assistive technology devices will be provided to those individuals at each stage of the rehabilitation process and how those services and devices will be provided to individuals with disabilities on a statewide basis;

  1. outreach procedures to identify and serve individuals with disabilities who are minorities, including those with the most significant disabilities in accordance with subsection 6.6 of the State Plan supplement, and individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program;

  1. as applicable, the plan of the state for establishing, developing or improving community rehabilitation programs;

  1. strategies to improve the performance of the state with respect to the evaluation standards and performance indicators established pursuant to Section 106 of the Rehabilitation Act; and

  1. strategies for assisting other components of the statewide work force investment system in assisting individuals with disabilities.

  1. Attachment 4.11 (d) describes how the designated state agency uses these strategies to:

  1. address the needs identified in the assessment conducted under paragraph 4.11(a) and achieve the goals and priorities identified in the State Plan attachments under paragraph 4.11(c);

  1. support the innovation and expansion activities identified in subparagraph 4.12(a)(1) and (2) of the plan; and

  1. overcome identified barriers relating to equitable access to and participation of individuals with disabilities in the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and State Supported Employment Services Program.

(e) Evaluation and reports of progress.

  1. The designated state unit and the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state unit has a council, jointly submits to the commissioner an annual report on the results of an evaluation of the effectiveness of the vocational rehabilitation program and the progress made in improving the effectiveness of the program from the previous year.

  1. Attachment 4.11(e)(2):

  1. provides an evaluation of the extent to which the goals identified in Attachment 4.11(c)(1) and, if applicable, Attachment 4.11(c)(3) were achieved;

  1. identifies the strategies that contributed to the achievement of the goals and priorities;

  1. describes the factors that impeded their achievement, to the extent they were not achieved;

  1. assesses the performance of the state on the standards and indicators established pursuant to Section 106 of the Rehabilitation Act; and

  1. provides a report consistent with paragraph 4.12(c) of the plan on how the funds reserved for innovation and expansion activities were utilized in the preceding year.

4.12 Innovation and expansion. (Section 101(a)(18) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.35)

(a) The designated state agency reserves and uses a portion of the funds allotted to the state under Section 110 of the Rehabilitation Act for the:

  1. development and implementation of innovative approaches to expand and improve the provision of vocational rehabilitation services to individuals with disabilities under this State Plan, particularly individuals with the most significant disabilities, consistent with the findings of the statewide assessment identified in Attachment 4.11(a) and goals and priorities of the state identified in Attachments 4.11(c)(1) and, if applicable, Attachment 4.11(c)(3); and

  1. support of the funding for the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has such a council, consistent with the resource plan prepared under Section 105(d)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.17(i), and the funding of the Statewide Independent Living Council, consistent with the resource plan prepared under Section 705(e)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 364.21(i).

(b) Attachment 4.11 (d) describes how the reserved funds identified in subparagraph 4.12(a)(1) and (2) will be utilized.
(c) Attachment 4.11(e)(2) describes how the reserved funds were utilized in the preceding year.

4.13 Reports. (Section 101(a)(10) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.40)

(a) The designated state unit submits reports in the form and level of detail and at the time required by the commissioner regarding applicants for and eligible individuals receiving services under the State Plan.
(b) Information submitted in the reports provides a complete count, unless sampling techniques are used, of the applicants and eligible individuals in a manner that permits the greatest possible cross-classification of data and protects the confidentiality of the identity of each individual.

Section 5: Administration of the Provision of Vocational Rehabilitation Services

5.1 Information and referral services. (Sections 101(a)(5)(D) and (20) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.37)

The designated state agency has implemented an information and referral system that is adequate to ensure that individuals with disabilities, including individuals who do not meet the agency"s order of selection criteria for receiving vocational rehabilitation services if the agency is operating on an order of selection, are provided accurate vocational rehabilitation information and guidance, including counseling and referral for job placement, using appropriate modes of communication, to assist such individuals in preparing for, securing, retaining or regaining employment, and are referred to other appropriate federal and state programs, including other components of the statewide work force investment system in the state.

5.2 Residency. (Section 101(a)(12) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.42(c)(1))

The designated state unit imposes no duration of residence requirement as part of determining an individual"s eligibility for vocational rehabilitation services or that excludes from services under the plan any individual who is present in the state.

5.3 Ability to serve all eligible individuals; order of selection for services. (Sections 12(d) and 101(a)(5) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.36)

(a) The designated state unit is able to provide the full range of services listed in Section 103(a) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.48, as appropriate, to all eligible individuals with disabilities in the state who apply for services. No

(b) If No:

  1. Individuals with the most significant disabilities, in accordance with criteria established by the state, are selected first for vocational rehabilitation services before other individuals with disabilities.

  1. Attachment 4.11(c)(3):

  1. shows the order to be followed in selecting eligible individuals to be provided vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. provides a justification for the order of selection; and

  1. identifies the state"s service and outcome goals and the time within which these goals may be achieved for individuals in each priority category within the order.

  1. Eligible individuals who do not meet the order of selection criteria have access to the services provided through the designated state unit"s information and referral system established under Section 101(a)(20) of the Rehabilitation Act, 34 CFR 361.37, and subsection 5.1 of this State Plan.

5.4 Availability of comparable services and benefits. (Sections 101(a)(8) and 103(a) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.53)

(a) Prior to providing any vocational rehabilitation services, except those services identified in paragraph (b), to an eligible individual or to members of the individual"s family, the state unit determines whether comparable services and benefits exist under any other program and whether those services and benefits are available to the individual.
(b) The following services are exempt from a determination of the availability of comparable services and benefits:

  1. assessment for determining eligibility and vocational rehabilitation needs by qualified personnel, including, if appropriate, an assessment by personnel skilled in rehabilitation technology;

  1. counseling and guidance, including information and support services to assist an individual in exercising informed choice consistent with the provisions of Section 102(d) of the Rehabilitation Act;

  1. referral and other services to secure needed services from other agencies, including other components of the statewide work force investment system, through agreements developed under Section 101(a)(11) of the Rehabilitation Act, if such services are not available under this State Plan;

  1. job-related services, including job search and placement assistance, job retention services, follow-up services, and follow-along services;

  1. rehabilitation technology, including telecommunications, sensory and other technological aids and devices; and

  1. post-employment services consisting of the services listed under subparagraphs (1) through (5) of this paragraph.

(c) The requirements of paragraph (a) of this section do not apply if the determination of the availability of comparable services and benefits under any other program would interrupt or delay:

  1. progress of the individual toward achieving the employment outcome identified in the individualized plan for employment;

  1. an immediate job placement; or

  1. provision of vocational rehabilitation services to any individual who is determined to be at extreme medical risk, based on medical evidence provided by an appropriate qualified medical professional.

(d) The governor in consultation with the designated state vocational rehabilitation agency and other appropriate agencies ensures that an interagency agreement or other mechanism for interagency coordination that meets the requirements of Section 101(a)(8)(B)(i)-(iv) of the Rehabilitation Act takes effect between the designated state unit and any appropriate public entity, including the state Medicaid program, a public institution of higher education, and a component of the statewide work force investment system to ensure the provision of the vocational rehabilitation services identified in Section 103(a) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.48, other than the services identified in paragraph (b) of this section, that are included in the individualized plan for employment of an eligible individual, including the provision of those vocational rehabilitation services during the pendency of any dispute that may arise in the implementation of the interagency agreement or other mechanism for interagency coordination.

5.5 Individualized plan for employment. (Section 101(a)(9) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.45 and .46)

(a) An individualized plan for employment meeting the requirements of Section 102(b) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.45 and .46 is developed and implemented in a timely manner for each individual determined to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services, except if the state has implemented an order of selection, and is developed and implemented for each individual to whom the designated state unit is able to provide vocational rehabilitation services.
(b) Services to an eligible individual are provided in accordance with the provisions of the individualized plan for employment.

5.6 Opportunity to make informed choices regarding the selection of services and providers. (Sections 101(a)(19) and 102(d) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.52)

Applicants and eligible individuals or, as appropriate, their representatives are provided information and support services to assist in exercising informed choice throughout the rehabilitation process, consistent with the provisions of Section 102(d) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.52.

5.7 Services to American Indians. (Section 101(a)(13) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.30)

The designated state unit provides vocational rehabilitation services to American Indians who are individuals with disabilities residing in the state to the same extent as the designated state agency provides such services to other significant populations of individuals with disabilities residing in the state.

5.8 Annual review of individuals in extended employment or other employment under special certificate provisions of the fair labor standards act of 1938. (Section 101(a)(14) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.55)

(a) The designated state unit conducts an annual review and reevaluation of the status of each individual with a disability served under this State Plan:

  1. who has achieved an employment outcome in which the individual is compensated in accordance with Section 14(c) of the Fair Labor Standards Act (29 U.S.C. 214(c)); or

  1. whose record of services is closed while the individual is in extended employment on the basis that the individual is unable to achieve an employment outcome in an integrated setting or that the individual made an informed choice to remain in extended employment.

(b) The designated state unit carries out the annual review and reevaluation for two years after the individual"s record of services is closed (and thereafter if requested by the individual or, if appropriate, the individual"s representative) to determine the interests, priorities and needs of the individual with respect to competitive employment or training for competitive employment.
(c) The designated state unit makes maximum efforts, including the identification and provision of vocational rehabilitation services, reasonable accommodations and other necessary support services, to assist the individuals described in paragraph (a) in engaging in competitive employment.
(d) The individual with a disability or, if appropriate, the individual"s representative has input into the review and reevaluation and, through signed acknowledgement, attests that the review and reevaluation have been conducted.

5.9 Use of Title I funds for construction of facilities. (Sections 101(a)(17) and 103(b)(2)(A) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.49(a)(1), .61 and .62(b))

If the state elects to construct, under special circumstances, facilities for community rehabilitation programs, the following requirements are met:

(a) The federal share of the cost of construction for facilities for a fiscal year does not exceed an amount equal to 10 percent of the state"s allotment under Section 110 of the Rehabilitation Act for that fiscal year.
(b) The provisions of Section 306 of the Rehabilitation Act that were in effect prior to the enactment of the Rehabilitation Act Amendments of 1998 apply to such construction.
(c) There is compliance with the requirements in 34 CFR 361.62(b) that ensure the use of the construction authority will not reduce the efforts of the designated state agency in providing other vocational rehabilitation services other than the establishment of facilities for community rehabilitation programs.

5.10 Contracts and cooperative agreements. (Section 101(a)(24) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.31 and .32)

(a) Contracts with for-profit organizations.

The designated state agency has the authority to enter into contracts with for-profit organizations for the purpose of providing, as vocational rehabilitation services, on-the-job training and related programs for individuals with disabilities under Part A of Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act, upon the determination by the designated state agency that for-profit organizations are better qualified to provide vocational rehabilitation services than nonprofit agencies and organizations.

(b) Cooperative agreements with private nonprofit organizations.

Attachment 4.8(b)(3) describes the manner in which the designated state agency establishes cooperative agreements with private nonprofit vocational rehabilitation service providers.

Section 6: Program Administration

6.1 Designated state agency. (Section 625(b)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(a))

The designated state agency for vocational rehabilitation services identified in paragraph 1.2 of the Title I State Plan is the state agency designated to administer the State Supported Employment Services Program authorized under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act.

6.2 Statewide assessment of supported employment services needs. (Section 625(b)(2) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(b))

Attachment 4.11(a) describes the results of the comprehensive, statewide needs assessment conducted under Section 101(a)(15)(a)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and subparagraph 4.11(a)(1) of the Title I State Plan with respect to the rehabilitation needs of individuals with most significant disabilities and their need for supported employment services, including needs related to coordination.

6.3 Quality, scope and extent of supported employment services. (Section 625(b)(3) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(c) and .50(b)(2))

Attachment 6.3 describes the quality, scope and extent of supported employment services to be provided to individuals with the most significant disabilities who are eligible to receive supported employment services. The description also addresses the timing of the transition to extended services to be provided by relevant state agencies, private nonprofit organizations or other sources following the cessation of supported employment service provided by the designated state agency.

6.4 Goals and plans for distribution of Title VI, Part B, funds. (Section 625(b)(3) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(d) and .20)

Attachment 4.11(c)(4) identifies the state's goals and plans with respect to the distribution of funds received under Section 622 of the Rehabilitation Act.

6.5 Evidence of collaboration with respect to supported employment services and extended services. (Sections 625(b)(4) and (5) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(e))

Attachment 4.8(b)(4) describes the efforts of the designated state agency to identify and make arrangements, including entering into cooperative agreements, with other state agencies and other appropriate entities to assist in the provision of supported employment services and other public or nonprofit agencies or organizations within the state, employers, natural supports, and other entities with respect to the provision of extended services.

6.6 Minority outreach. (34 CFR 363.11(f))

Attachment 4.11(d) includes a description of the designated state agency's outreach procedures for identifying and serving individuals with the most significant disabilities who are minorities.

6.7 Reports. (Sections 625(b)(8) and 626 of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(h) and .52)

The designated state agency submits reports in such form and in accordance with such procedures as the commissioner may require and collects the information required by Section 101(a)(10) of the Rehabilitation Act separately for individuals receiving supported employment services under Part B, of Title VI and individuals receiving supported employment services under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act.

Section 7: Financial Administration

7.1 Five percent limitation on administrative costs. (Section 625(b)(7) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(g)(8))

The designated state agency expends no more than five percent of the state's allotment under Section 622 of the Rehabilitation Act for administrative costs in carrying out the State Supported Employment Services Program.

7.2 Use of funds in providing services. (Sections 623 and 625(b)(6)(A) and (D) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.6(c)(2)(iv), .11(g)(1) and (4))

(a) Funds made available under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act are used by the designated state agency only to provide supported employment services to individuals with the most significant disabilities who are eligible to receive such services.
(b) Funds provided under Title VI, Part B, are used only to supplement and not supplant the funds provided under Title I, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act, in providing supported employment services specified in the individualized plan for employment.
(c) Funds provided under Part B of Title VI or Title I of the Rehabilitation Act are not used to provide extended services to individuals who are eligible under Part B of Title VI or Title I of the Rehabilitation Act.

Section 8: Provision of Supported Employment Services

8.1 Scope of supported employment services. (Sections 7(36) and 625(b)(6)(F) and (G) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.5(b)(54), 363.11(g)(6) and (7))

(a) Supported employment services are those services as defined in Section 7(36) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.5(b)(54).
(b) To the extent job skills training is provided, the training is provided on-site.
(c) Supported employment services include placement in an integrated setting for the maximum number of hours possible based on the unique strengths, resources, priorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, interests and informed choice of individuals with the most significant disabilities.

8.2 Comprehensive assessments of individuals with significant disabilities. (Sections 7(2)(B) and 625(b)(6)(B); 34 CFR 361.5(b)(6)(ii) and 363.11(g)(2))

The comprehensive assessment of individuals with significant disabilities conducted under Section 102(b)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and funded under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act includes consideration of supported employment as an appropriate employment outcome.

8.3 Individualized plan for employment. (Sections 102(b)(3)(F) and 625(b)(6)(C) and (E) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.46(b) and 363.11(g)(3) and (5))

(a) An individualized plan for employment that meets the requirements of Section 102(b) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.45 and .46 is developed and updated using funds under Title I.
(b) The individualized plan for employment:

  1. specifies the supported employment services to be provided;

  1. describes the expected extended services needed; and

  1. identifies the source of extended services, including natural supports, or, to the extent that it is not possible to identify the source of extended services at the time the individualized plan for employment plan is developed, a statement describing the basis for concluding that there is a reasonable expectation that sources will become available.

(c) Services provided under an individualized plan for employment are coordinated with services provided under other individualized plans established under other federal or state programs.
Screen 3 of 17

State Plan for the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program
and
State Plan Supplement for the State Supported Employment Services Program

California Department of Rehabilitation State Plan for Fiscal Year 2010 (submitted FY 2009)

Attachment 4.2(c) Input of State Rehabilitation Council

It is the mission of the California State Rehabilitation Council (SRC), in partnership with the California Department of Rehabilitation (DOR), to assure that Californians with disabilities are represented, informed and empowered; receive
necessary, sufficient and timely individualized services; and that these services are excellent and lead to meaningful employment.

The SRC provided input and recommendations to the DOR throughout Federal Fiscal Year (FFY) 2009 and has collaboratively worked with the DOR to increase the effectiveness of rehabilitation services consistent with the amended Rehabilitation Act of 1973.

The SRC Chair and Executive Officer meet on a monthly basis with the Director and Chief Deputy Director of the DOR to discuss matters of mutual interest and concern and the Council is vigilantly involved in all key projects of the DOR.

The Council is partnering with the DOR on modifications to and evaluation of its comprehensive statewide needs assessment project (SNAP) process. The SRC actively participated in the development of the State Plan, and represented the interests of Californians with disabilities at four public hearings on the State Plan and the SNAP. The SRC has been an active partner in the DORs Electronic Recording System (ERS) project. The ERS will enable the DOR to more effectively and efficiently serve applicants and eligible individuals with disabilities, thus impacting DORs future performance goals and objectives. Further, the SRC is awaiting results of the Business Process Analysis (BPA) aspect of the DORs proposals for revisions to the DORs existing Vocational Rehabilitation Services Delivery
System (VRSDS).

In addition to the above activities, the SRC has accomplished several key goals:

· Recruitment and appointment of new SRC members and reappointment of the Vice Chair;
· Second-year utilization of a revised Consumer Satisfaction Survey (CSS) tool;
· Continued emphasis on collaboration between employers and the DOR;
· Increased focus on DORs objectives, performance measures and strategies of DOR program goals; and
· Provided individualized written input via survey mechanism and participated in meetings regarding concepts on how best to allocate stimulus dollars available to the DOR through the Federal American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA).

Recruitment of New SRC Members
The Governors Office appointed three new members to the SRC and reappointed its Vice Chair. The new appointments have greatly enhanced the depth of knowledge and experience of the SRC in the areas of the business, education and mental health issues. In addition, they have allowed the SRC to increase the size and scope of its work. Each federally-mandated constituency is represented on the SRC.

Consumer Satisfaction Survey (CSS)
At the SRCs recommendation last year, the DOR developed a new CSS that contained questions addressing topics not previously addressed in an effort to identify areas of process and service delivery program improvement. This years sampling methodology increased by 33% the number of its random selection of individuals who access DOR services at three critical phases of DOR service delivery: pre-plan, in-plan and at time of case closure. As a result, the current CSS was distributed to 4,000 applicants and eligible individuals. The results are currently under evaluation.

The DOR will provide the SRC with its annual CSS report in September 2009.

Continued Emphasis on Collaboration Between Employers and the DOR
The SRC continued its work with the DOR to further develop DORs collaboration with employers. The Employment Enhancement Workteam worked closely with the DORs Workforce Development Section to provide assistance and recommendations on strategic marketing to employers by building mutually beneficial relationships with employers. The SRC assisted the DOR in its preparation of a draft marketing brochure to be widely distrbuted to employers throughout the State.

Increased Attention on DORs Performance Goals and Objectives
The SRC analyzes performance goals and objectives data at its quarterly meetings and interim workteam meetings, as well as through electronic communications. The SRC scrutinizes the DORs performance vis a vis RSAs performance standards and indicators, state plan performance measures and objectives agreed upon by the SRC and the DOR, employment outcome data, and a variety of other information. The former SRC chair is working with the DORs Budget, Fiscal Forecasting and Research (BFFR) to identify additional areas of interest to the SRC.

SRC FFY 2009 Recommendations to DOR

The SRC made various recommendations to the DOR during FFY 2009, through the month of June 2009. They are as follows:

1) That the DOR hire and maintain the employment of a SRC-dedicated Associate Governmental Program Analyst (AGPA) at a full-time (40 hours per week) level. Due to the state of the economy and Californias budget crisis, the DOR will not implement this recommendation. It is the intention of the SRC to resubmit the recommendation on an annual basis.

2) That for Phase I of the SNAP, the SRC and DOR implement the methodology of matching DOR consumer data with United States and State of California data from the Department of Finance as a supplemental method of identifying unserved and underserved individuals with disabilities. The SRC recommends that the DOR incorporate this methodology into any and all annual and/or triennial reporting. The DOR used this methodology and also collected data from other sources during Phase I of the current SNAP.

3) That the DOR do the following with respect to the Consumer Satisfaction Survey (CSS):
a. Maintain the current CSS process, distributing the survey to a random sampling of 4,000 consumers during different phases of their programs, and to engage in discussions for future surveys to be made available online. The DOR concurs with this recommendation;
b. Reply to respondents who requested on their questionnaires that they be contacted, using whatever means the DOR chooses to use. DORs response raised the issue of respondent confidentiality and the fact that responses were 7 months old at the time of the SRC recommendation. DOR proposes discussions of potential strategies to implement a feedback loop in real-time;
c. Engage in discussions to develop strategies addressing thematic issues from respondents to the request to Please tell us if there is anything we can do to improve our services to you. The DOR response stated that the CSS results will be provided to all DOR staff, and that the SRC is welcome to continue its attendance at District Administrator meetings where the issue may be raised; and
d. Engage in discussion to develop strategies to increase the survey return rate. The DOR welcomes a discussion to increase the rate.

4) That the DOR share with the SRC what action(s) it has taken and/or intends to take to address the following issues raised by the DORs District Administrators:
a. High position vacancy rates in the counselor (SVRC/QRP), support service assistant-interpreter (SSAI), and clerical ranks;
b. Insufficient staffing allocations;
c. Burdensome procurement and an obsolete mainframe case recording system; and
d. Budget constraints, specifically travel issues and office closures.
DORs responses:
a. DORs online SVRC/QRP exam provides a viable candidate list, and DORs Personnel and Information Systems Services Sections are working together to streamline the hiring process; discussions have been initiated with the State Personnel Board to change the SSAI minimum qualifications to add the Registry of Interpreters, which would expand exam eligibility requirements and increase the SSAI candidate pool;
b. The VRSDS model may impact position allocations;
c. The DOR will hire Procurement Specialists in all districts by the end of calendar year 2009 following a successful two-district pilot project; implementation of the Electronic Records System (ERS) Project will provide a new electronic case recording system that will increase counseling time with clients, decrease redundancy and data entry,and improve service delivery; and
d. Responses addressed prior activities, not future action plans.

Carryover Recommendation and DOR Response from FFY 2008

Following submission of the 2009 State Plan Update in June 2008, the SRC advanced to the DOR a recommendation that the DOR, in partnership with the Council, redevelop and maintain the SRCs webpage on the DORs internet website, focusing on information, programs and resources for DOR clients and the general public that align with the mission, goals and objectives of the SRC.

The DOR agreed with this recommendation. In August, 2008, the DOR informed the Council that it conceptually understood and supported the SRCs webpage containing such things as the Councils mission statement, goals, objectives, mandated functions, activities, meeting agendas, notices and minutes, reports, clients rights, DOR and SRC organization charts, service data and frequently asked questions. The DOR further agreed that the webpage was to include links that are in compliance with Section 508 accessibility. The DOR also concurred with the SRCs statement that webpage content be approved prior to posting through appropriate staff and/or management channels to ensure consistency with statewide rules and standards.

Once the webpage is fully developed and approved for publishing following consultation between the SRC and the DORs Information Systems Services Branch (ISS), the role and responsibility for furnishing updates and new information from the SRC will be conducted through the Councils staff support. ISS will be responsible for posting the information to the webpage and the accuracy of the posting.

This screen was last updated on Sep 24 2009 5:50PM by Melyssa Adams

Screen 4 of 17

State Plan for the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program
and
State Plan Supplement for the State Supported Employment Services Program

California Department of Rehabilitation State Plan for Fiscal Year 2010 (submitted FY 2009)

Attachment 4.7(b)(3) Request for Waiver of Statewideness

The California Department of Rehabilitation (DOR) maintains interagency agreements (IAs) with the California Department of Education (CDE), Department of Mental Health (DMH), Employment Development Department (EDD), Department of Developmental Services (DDS), as well as institutions of higher education. These statewide agreements provide leadership, oversight, and administrative support to locally developed cooperative agreements and programs. Locally DOR has directly entered into agreements with public entities such as public universities and community colleges, local education agencies (LEAs), county mental health and social service agencies. Although the DOR has local cooperative agreements in each DOR district, DOR does not contract with every LEA, County, or other potential cooperative partner in the State. Therefore, these cooperative programs are not statewide. The DOR does not have sufficient staff resources or budget authority to work with every potential cooperative partner. Also, these are voluntary programs, so they are contingent upon the interest of the local partner agency.

The locally developed cooperative agreements include:

· Transition Partnership ProjectsThe Transition Partnership Projects service secondary and post-secondary students with disabilities by facilitating the effective transition of the DORs student consumers from school to meaningful employment. Statewide, these programs are administered through cooperative agreements with LEAs and Special Education Local Plan Areas (SELPAs). These LEAs and SELPAs furnish the non-federal share of costs either through certified expenditures or cash match. The certified expenditures from the LEAs and the SELPAs are provided by redirected education staff providing unique patterns of vocational rehabilitation (VR) services exclusively to DOR student consumers. Under these agreements DOR assigns Senior Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors (SVRC) to be active members of the program team. The DOR opens cases and provides enhanced VR services for at least one year prior to the student consumers leaving high school. The LEA provides training and enhanced programming exclusively to DOR consumers. This is to enable DOR consumers to achieve employment utilizing community based vocational instruction, vocational and worksite training, job placement, work incentive wages, and follow-up services to exiting DOR student consumers. Augmented services include vocational assessment, career development, work experience, job search skills training, job development, placement, and follow-up, and non-supported employment job coaching. These contracted services are not the educational services that the LEA is legally mandated or required to provide. They are new, enhanced or added services that meet the local needs of DOR consumers and are available only to consumers of the DOR. Currently, DOR has 100 Transition Partnership Projects agreements in all 14 DOR districts

· WorkAbility IIThe WorkAbility II Program serves adults and out-of-school youth with disabilities. Statewide these programs are administered through cooperative agreements with LEAs, adult schools, and Regional Occupational Programs (ROPs). These LEAs, adult schools and ROPs all furnish the non-federal share of costs either through a certified expenditure or cash match.

· The certified expenditures from the LEAs/ROPs are provided by redirected education staff providing unique patterns of VR services exclusively to DOR student consumers. Consumers are referred to the WorkAbility II Programs by their SVRC for enhanced in-plan VR services which include vocational and basic skills assessment, specific job skills training, pre-employment preparation, worksite evaluation, job placement, job coaching, and ongoing follow-up after vocational placement. These contracted services are unique or expanded from the educational services the LEA is legally mandated or required to provide. They are new, enhanced or added services that meet the local needs of DOR consumers and are available only to consumers of the DOR. Currently, THE DOR has 10 WorkAbility II agreements in 7 DOR districts.


· WorkAbility IIIThe WorkAbility III Program serves individuals with disabilities who are both community college students and DOR consumers desiring and in need of employment. Statewide these programs are administered through cooperative agreements with community colleges. The community colleges furnish the non-federal share of costs either through certified expenditures or cash match. The certified expenditures from the community colleges are provided by redirected education staff providing unique patterns of VR services exclusively to DOR student consumers.

· Consumers are referred to the WorkAbility III Programs by their SVRC for enhanced in-plan vocational services. Augmented services include vocational assessment, career development, work experience, job search skills training and job development and placement. The services in the WorkAbility III agreements are not the educational services that the Community College is legally mandated or required to provide. They are new, enhanced or added services that meet the local needs of DOR consumers and are available only to consumers of the DOR. Currently, DOR has 27 WorkAbility III agreements in 11 DOR districts.

· WorkAbility IV - The WorkAbility IV Program serves individuals who are DOR consumers and either California State University (CSU) students or University of California (UC) students, desiring and in need of employment. Statewide these programs are administered through cooperative agreements with CSU and UC. These universities furnish the non-federal share of costs through certified expenditures. The certified expenditures from the universities are provided by redirected university staff providing unique patterns of VR services exclusively to DOR student consumers. Consumers are referred to the WorkAbility IV program by their SVRC for in-plan VR services.

· The DOR consumers receive specialized vocational services such as job development and placement, job search skills instruction, work experience and internships, employment related counseling, and job retention services to student consumers and employers. The services in the WorkAbility IV agreements are not educational services that the CSU or UC campus is legally mandated or required to provide. They are new, enhanced or added services that meet the local needs of DOR consumers and are available only to consumers of the DOR. Currently, DOR has 11 WorkAbility IV contracts in 8 DOR districts.

· Mental Health Cooperative Programs - The Mental Health Cooperative Programs serve county Mental Health consumers with severe psychiatric disabilities who are also DOR consumers by assisting them to obtain employment and to live independently in their communities. Statewide these programs are administered through cooperative agreements with County Mental Health agencies and private non-profit organizations. County Mental Health agencies furnish the non-federal share of costs through certified expenditures or cash contribution. The certified expenditures from the County Mental Health agencies are provided by redirected County Mental Health staff providing unique VR services exclusively to DOR consumers. Consumers are referred to DOR by participating Mental Health agencies for VR services. The cooperative agreements develop linkages to community agencies such as private non-profit agencies specializing in employment service programs for persons with severe psychiatric disabilities. The Mental Health Cooperatives provide unique vocational service options for consumers, which include vocational assessment and evaluation, personal vocational and social adjustment, work adjustment, employment preparation, job development and placement, and job coaching. The services in the Mental Health Cooperative Program agreements are not the mental health treatment services that the County is legally mandated or otherwise required to provide. They are new, enhanced or added services that meet the local needs of DOR consumers and are available only to consumers of the DOR. Currently, DOR has 29 Mental Health Cooperative Program agreements in 13 DOR districts.

· The State Hospital Cooperative Program is funded through certified expenditures by DMH central office staff. The certified expenditures fund SVRC positions and case service funds for the purpose of facilitating the transition of vocational services from the state hospital environment to the community. Once discharged, DOR consumers receive employment services, which include vocational assessment, career development, job search skills training, and job development and placement. The State Hospitals are required to provide intensive mental health treatment services to patients while they are in the hospital. They are not required to provide services, vocational or otherwise, once the client is discharged. This IA serves to bridge the referral gap between the State Hospital and the community. It provides funding for DOR to provide VR services to State Hospital clients upon discharge. Currently, this IA serves consumers from the four major State Hospitals. Consumers are discharged from the State Hospital to their community or origin, which may be anywhere in the State.

· Traumatic Brain Injury Cooperative ProgramThe Traumatic Brain Injury Cooperative Program is a joint venture between DOR and DMH. DMH furnishes the non-federal share of costs through a cash contribution. The cooperative serves DOR consumers with traumatic brain injuries in Sacramento and San Luis Obispo. Both sites provide a variety of services including vocational assessment, personal vocational and social adjustment, work adjustment, employment preparation, job development and placement, and job coaching. The Traumatic Brain Injury projects are required to provide supportive services to clients to enable them to live as independently as possible in the community. The services in the Traumatic Brain Injury agreements are not services that DMH is legally mandated or otherwise required to provide. They are new, enhanced or added services that meet the local needs of DOR consumers and are available only to consumers of the DOR.

· Welfare Cooperative ProgramThese cooperative programs serve DOR consumers who receive Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF). The DOR and the county social service agencies for San Francisco and San Mateo have collaborated in developing IAs that provide the basis for local county cooperative projects. These projects provide enhanced VR services to consumers with disabilities in San Mateo and San Francisco Counties who meet the eligibility criteria for both CalWORKS (Californias Welfare Program) and DOR services. These consumers maintain direct access to CalWORKS program services. Local county social service agencies furnish the non-federal share of costs through a cash match, which supports new SVRC allocations and case services funds. The DOR consumers receive the following vocational services: vocational assessment, career development, job search skills training, and job development and placement. The services in the welfare cooperative agreements are not services that the County Welfare agencies are legally mandated or required to provide. It provides funding for DOR to provide VR services to selected County TANF recipients who have a disability. They are new, enhanced or added services that meet the local needs of DOR consumers and are available only to consumers of the DOR.

· Foster Youth Cooperative Program  In collaboration with local agencies such as local workforce investment area One-Stop operators, youth service providers, foster youth group home operators, and a private not-for-profit corporation, DOR has developed a transition program for youth with disabilities exiting (aging-out) of the foster youth system. The goal of this program is to better coordinate and serve foster youth with disabilities interested in obtaining employment in conjunction with their exit from the foster youth system. This program was created to serve 17-18 year old youth residents with disabilities in Placer County. These youth are selected from foster group homes. Referrals to the foster youth cooperative program are made by the group home operators to the community program responsible for the education of and training of youth in Placer County. The community program then refers the youth to DOR, which opens a case and begins developing a plan to provide services, when appropriate. Once a case has been opened and eligibility established, DOR refers the consumers to a private not-for-profit agency (Pride Industries), for supportive services, including arranging for an external situational assessment. The cases continue to be co-managed by DOR, Pride Industries and the Placer County youth services until such time as a successful placement has been achieved and the case can be closed. The DOR consumers receive employment services which include vocational assessment, career development, job search skills training, work experience, job development and placement, and non-supported employment job coaching. This agreement serves to bridge the gap between the Foster care system and the community. The services in the Foster Youth agreement are not services that the County is legally mandated or otherwise required to provide. They are new, enhanced or added services that meet the local needs of DOR consumers and are available only to consumers of the DOR.

The local public agencies with which DOR has cooperative agreements provide DOR with written assurances that they will make available to DOR the non-federal share of the funds. Each local agreement contains language that assures that the cooperative partner agency will make the non-federal share available to the DOR, and also specify the amount of the funds as well as time frames for submission. These third-party cooperative agreements are binding state contracts that are approved by local governmental boards and are jointly signed and executed by DOR and local governmental agency representatives prior to the delivery of services. Through the third-party cooperative agreements local and state public agencies certify to the State, on a monthly/quarterly basis, the actual expenditure of funds that comprise the contribution of non-federal funds. All certified match and cash match expenditures received are under the administrative supervision of DOR and no portion of the match expenditures come from Federal funds. The total cooperative agency certified expenditure share is matched to Federal funds at no less than 25%. The total cooperative agency cash match share is matched to Federal funds at no less than 21.3%. The DOR has developed fiscal monitoring and reporting procedures and tools for both the DOR district staff and cooperative program contract administrators. The DOR Audit services section has developed a Contractor Self Assessment tool, and the Contract Manual provides detailed information on invoicing and supporting documentation requirements. The DOR provides annual training to local contract administrators regarding the development of contracts, and has additional training available regarding contract monitoring and invoicing. The DOR also keeps data and conducts oversight of contract match and payment invoicing. This information is used to provide local technical assistance during program reviews, site visits, and on an as needed basis.

These agreements, including the federally written assurances, are available upon request at the DOR.

If the value of the actual time certified by the cooperative agency falls below the actual total program cost, DOR reserves the right to reduce the program costs accordingly. All VR services provided to DOR consumers, through a third party cooperative agreement, are contractually identified with negotiated service goals. The provision of each vocational service is monitored and reported by the local DOR contract administrator. The DOR reports and distributes the outcome goals for each program on both a monthly and annual basis. All VR services provided under third party cooperative agreements must be authorized or otherwise approved by the SVRC in consultation with the DOR consumer in advance of provision of services.

The vocational services provided under DOR third party cooperative agreements comply with federal regulations requiring a unique pattern of service. Specifically, the regulations require that the services provided by the cooperating agency are not the customary or typical services provided by that agency but are new services that have a vocational rehabilitation focus or existing services that have been modified, adapted, expanded, or reconfigured to have a vocational rehabilitation focus. The DOR has built in assurances that the third party cooperative programs will meet this federal requirement. New programs are required to explain how the services in the proposed contract will meet this requirement when they apply for funding. A description of the services to be provided is contained in each contracts scope of work. Each cooperative contract also contains duty statements for staff that contrast the cooperative program functions to duties performed under their traditional agency role. Contract standard language also refers to the requirements to adhere to the Rehabilitation Act, and specifically to the requirement of a new pattern of service. These agreements are available upon request at the DOR.

The vocational services provided under DOR third party cooperative agreements comply with all provisions of the DOR State Plan, including both application and plan services. The DOR has been operating under an Order of Selection (OOS) policy since September 1, 1995. All DOR consumers, regardless of the service provider, are subject to the OOS policy. To assure compliance with the OOS policy, only consumers who meet OOS service criteria receive services from cooperative partners through third-party agreements.

The DOR will continue, under this State Plan, to work with its existing cooperative partners in providing VR services. The DOR will also continue its efforts to increase the statewide availability of enhanced VR services through both formal agreements and Memorandums of Understandings, and will demonstrate administrative oversight of these programs through comprehensive program evaluations and site visits.

This screen was last updated on Jul 13 2009 1:57PM by Ken Schellenberg

Screen 5 of 17

State Plan for the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program
and
State Plan Supplement for the State Supported Employment Services Program

California Department of Rehabilitation State Plan for Fiscal Year 2010 (submitted FY 2009)

Attachment 4.8(b)(1) Cooperative Agreements with Agencies Not Carrying Out Activities Under the Statewide Workforce Investment System

To maximize limited resources and assist individuals to access other programs, the California Department of Rehabilitation (DOR) seeks to work cooperatively with numerous other state and local agencies and programs. Collaborative efforts are manifested through Memorandums of Understanding (MOUs) and Interagency Agreements (IAs) coordinated throughout the State.

The following state level MOUs and IAs fall under four general categories, those with Health and Human Services Agencies (HHSA), Education Agencies, Labor Agencies and the Social Security Administration (SSA).

During federal fiscal year 2010, the DOR is offering additional funding, provided by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) of 2009, by contract for enhanced employment services to public and private agencies that currently have existing agreements with the department. The ARRA cooperative contracts are designed to serve existing DOR consumers who are already participating in Health and Human Services or Education agency agreements.

Health and Human Services Agencies
· Department of Mental Health (DMH) System of Care IA: Provides staff and resources to provide statewide administrative and program support for public mental health and vocational rehabilitation (VR) services to consumers with severe psychiatric disabilities.
· DMH Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) Program IA: Provides funding to add focused VR services to persons with traumatic brain injuries who are participating in DMH-administered TBI programs throughout California.
· DMH Long Term Care Division IA: Facilitates the DOR providing VR services to patients leaving four out of five DMH state hospitals in California. The four facilities are Patton, Metropolitan, Atascadero and Napa.
· California Department of Aging (CDA) MOU: Provides the framework for CDA and the DOR staff to collaborate and coordinate in the areas of outreach, policy development, public information activities, program and service delivery for older adults who, through necessity or preference, seek employment. This agreement also facilitates reciprocal information sharing and technical assistance to benefit the consumers of both departments.
· California Department of Developmental Services (DDS) IA regarding Vocational Rehabilitation Work Activity Program (VR/WAP) Participant Transportation: Allows the DOR to provide transportation services to developmentally disabled DDS consumers who are served through the VR/WAP Program.

Education Agencies

· California Department of Education (CDE) IA: Identifies staff and resources necessary to provide administrative oversight of the DORs secondary and adult school programs. This IA provides the monetary resources needed for the DOR to develop new programs, conduct program reviews and audits of existing programs, and provide training on program and contract development. This IA is also a mechanism to provide annual oversight on a mutual basis.

· CDE MOU: Creates an effective and efficient transition from school to post-school activities, including VR services for eligible secondary students with disabilities who meet priority of service under the Order of Selection (OOS). This agreement identifies policies, practices, and procedures to ensure a seamless delivery of transition services to eligible consumers.

· California Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators MOU: Establishes guidelines for the joint financial support of DOR student-consumers to achieve their educational goals, eventually leading to employment. This agreement supports students enrolled in the California post-secondary setting with a financial aid office on campus.

· California Community Colleges Chancellor's Office IA: Establishes guidelines for services to shared consumers for the DOR and California Community Colleges.

· California State University Office of the Chancellor MOU: Establishes guidelines for services to shared consumers for the DOR and California State Universities.

· University of California Office of the President MOU: Establishes guidelines for services to shared consumers for the DOR and University of California System.

· California School for the Deaf (Fremont and Riverside) IA: Establishes a cooperative program, between the DOR and the CDE, serving the DOR student-consumers who are deaf or hard of hearing to improve transition linkages between the state school and VR counselors.

· California School for the Blind (Fremont) IA: Establishes a cooperative program, between the DOR and the CDE, serving DOR student-consumers, who are blind or visually impaired, to improve transition linkages between the state school and VR counselors.

Workforce Investment Act System Agencies: Due to the nature of the Workforce Investment system in California, the DOR maintains distinct Interagency Agreements and Memorandums of Understanding with the Employment Development Department for office space, employer information, wage information, activities of the Governors Committee on Employment of People with Disabilities, and collaborations related to employment information. Each of these agreements is listed separately.
· Employment Development Department (EDD) MOU regarding Access to Quarterly Employer Reports: Allows the DOR access to employer information maintained by the EDD Labor Market Information Division. Data requested are supplied on a CD-Rom containing a statewide list of employers with 50 or more employees sorted by zip code (includes name, address, and North American Industry Classification System code of employer). The information garnered is intended to assist the DOR staff in proactive employer outreach efforts and assist consumers in their vocational planning and employment search.

· EDD MOU regarding Mutual Cooperation and Support for the California Governors Committee on Employment of People with Disabilities (CGCEPD): Enhances the ability of EDD and the DOR to reach common objectives of meaningful employment for persons with disabilities by working cooperatively in support of the CGCEPD and its affiliated community and mayors committees. Each department will assist in the preparation and referral of consumers with disabilities for employment and cooperation in a variety of activities including training, technical assistance, and labor market information.

· EDD Job Services MOU: Establishes a system of liaison activities, coordination of resources, and general cooperation between the DOR and EDD for the purpose of providing increased job opportunities for consumers with disabilities in either department. Through this agreement EDD provides job services (i.e., labor market information, ability to browse job listings, enter a resume for employers to browse, job search workshops, intensive placement services, linkages to employers and industry groups) to all persons with a disability.

· EDD IA regarding Wage Abstracts: Allows EDD to produce and provide the DOR with wage and employer address information for the purpose of employment verification of DOR consumers. This information can be used to close the case for those DOR consumers who are successfully employed and to conduct federally required evaluations of the federal VR program.

Social Security Administration (SSA)

Ticket to Work and Work Incentives Act MOU: allows the DOR to develop an Employment Network Referral and Partnership MOU with three employment networks under the SSAs Ticket to Work Program. The MOU is standard for all employment networks and sets forth the provisions under which an employment network and the DOR would jointly serve consumers who are also SSA beneficiaries.

Other: Department of Agriculture/State Contracting Programs

The DOR works cooperatively with and utilizes Rural Economic Area Partnerships, and other programs carried out by the Under Secretary for Rural Development of the United States Department of Agriculture, when these programs and resources are available to local communities for economic development, and to the extent such cooperation and utilization is permissible under § 101(a)(4) of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended. For FFY 2009, no Rural Economic Area Partnership programs and resources have been made available to the DOR and the same applies for state use contracting programs.

The following is a listing of all other MOUs and IAs administered by the DOR.

Agency: Description

California State University, Sacramento IA: Provides eighty hours of supervisory training for departments of the HHSA specifically designed to reflect the Mission and Goals of the HHSA.

CSU Northridge (CSUN) IA: Funds an assistive technology project to establish equipment loan programs in 10 community-based organizations across California. Also provides for CSUN to administer the DORs guaranteed loan programs for vehicles and for assistive technology. Source of funds: Assistive Technology Act.

Employment Development Department (EDD) IA: Allows EDD to provide the DOR with wage and employer information for consumers whose cases were closed in status 26, employment outcome achieved, and receiving Social Security benefits. This information is then used to obtain reimbursements from the SSA for successfully rehabilitated Social Security Disability Insurance/ Supplemental Security Income-consumers.

General Services, Department of; Office of Administrative Hearings (OAH) IA: Provides mediation services to DOR consumers/applicants who have requested a fair hearing and/or requested to participate in mediation. The OAH mediators assist the DOR and the consumer/applicant in exploring options for mutual resolution of a dispute in a timely, non-confrontational manner. Through mediation, individuals can better understand the application of department regulations and policies, and staff can better understand an individual's needs.

General Services, Department of; OAH IA: Provides administration of hearings for the DOR Business Enterprise Program (BEP) vendor appeals.

General Services, Department of; Office of Risk and Insurance Management IA: Provides management of the BEPs statewide insurance program funded from food service vending machine locations.

Industrial Relations, Department of; Division of Workers Compensation IA: Provides a physical access survey of 20 offices statewide and consultations to determine policy modifications needed to comply with the ADA.

Local Workforce Investment Boards MOUs: For each Local Workforce Investment Board, identifies the manner that vocational services will be coordinated and provided to clients that the DOR has determined to be eligible, and for whom one-stop services are necessary and appropriate.

State Compensation Insurance Fund IA: Provides driving evaluations, consultations, driver training, follow-ups, and equipment recommendations to individuals "injured on the job," who require adaptive equipment to drive safely and independently. These injured individuals with physical disabilities require financial support from SCIF while recovering from their work-related injuries.

State Controller's Office IA: Expedites services to process claim schedules containing vendor invoices for services/goods provided to DOR staff and consumers. To continue services and comply with the Prompt Payment Act requires timely payment.

State Independent Living Council (SILC) IA: Funds the operations of the SILC and provides SILC funds for various subgrants and contracts necessary to carry out certain objectives of the State Plan for Independent Living. All funds are for programs for people with disabilities. Source of funds: Title VII B, Rehabilitation Act; renewed annually indefinitely.

State Personnel Board IA: Provides statewide Reasonable Accommodation training to Equal Opportunity Officers, ADA Coordinators, Return to Work Coordinators, and Human Resources Personnel.

State Treasurer's Office IA: Allows the State Treasurers Office to provide to the DOR information relative to checks redeemed by the STO for the DOR's revolving fund account. Information is sent electronically.

Technology Services, Department of, IA: Allows the DOR to obtain routine data processing services, as described by State Administrative Manual Section 5210.1.

This screen was last updated on Sep 24 2009 5:47PM by Melyssa Adams

Screen 6 of 17

State Plan for the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program
and
State Plan Supplement for the State Supported Employment Services Program

California Department of Rehabilitation State Plan for Fiscal Year 2010 (submitted FY 2009)

Attachment 4.8(b)(2) Coordination with Education Officials

The California Department of Rehabilitation (DOR) has developed strategic plans, policies, and procedures that are designed to facilitate the transition of students who are receiving special education services from an educational agency to the provision of vocational rehabilitation (VR) services provided by the DOR.

Commensurate with the requirements of both the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and the Rehabilitation Act, the DOR has collaborated with the California Department of Education (CDE) through an Interagency Agreement (IA) specifically to address consultation and technical assistance, transition planning, roles and responsibilities, and outreach for secondary students with disabilities. This agreement provides for the following:

1. Consultation and Technical Assistance: The DOR participates in a group comprised of representatives from multiple agencies and stakeholders, who have a shared responsibility and interest in serving transition age youth. The statewide initiative entitled Communities of Practice (CoP) was created and supported by the National Association of Special Education Administrators. The program is developing links to shared work websites nationally and sponsors state level conferences sharing best practices for youth with disabilities. The leadership team for this project includes management from the following state departments: The DOR, CDE, Department of Social Services, Department of Developmental Services, Department of Mental Health, Employment Development Department, along with the State Independent Living Council.

The DOR has identified state level and district level specialists responsible for developing and monitoring transition programs, grants and initiatives as well as developing and providing training opportunities. State and local staff from each agency work together to plan and implement evaluation activities, including individual accountability measures for shared students/consumers. These activities address interagency effectiveness, longitudinal outcomes, cooperative research and pilot projects with the Social Security Administration (SSA), Rehabilitation Services Administration (RSA) youth mentor programs and other joint efforts to document and improve the effectiveness of transition services.

In some instances, the DOR Senior Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors provide a general consultative role for students receiving free and appropriate public education who are not DOR consumers.

In addition, The DOR has developed a resource manual that facilitates the development of local Memorandum Of Understandings (MOU) with evaluation tools to gauge the success of interagency collaboration with education agencies at the local level.

California Mentoring Initiative:
The California Mentoring Initiative for Youth with Disabilities has been a five-year research based project funded by RSA and designed to develop the competence and potential of youth with disabilities. Funded through September 30, 2009, the DOR works in collaboration with San Diego State Universitys Interwork Institute to establish a mentoring model that will increase community integration, postsecondary education, and employment for youth participating in the rehabilitation system.

Two pilot site contractors serving Orange County and Santa Clara County have worked with appropriate constituents in recruiting, matching, and managing the mentor program, with San Diego State University providing mentor training curriculum and compiling the data from both pilot sites. The project has provided mentors for up to 200 DOR consumers.

2. Transition Planning:
Transition Planning by DOR and LEAs that Facilitate Individual Education Plans (IEPs):

The LEA and the DOR use a collaborative team process to develop the transition services section of the IEP and the Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) for the transitioning student. This process includes the involvement of the student/consumer, family, and representatives of education, the DOR, and other service providers, as appropriate. This process assists in the coordination of goals, objectives, services and timeframes.

The development of the transition services section of the IEP and the IPE include the provision to share documents, provided appropriate signature authorizations have been given for the release of information, that provide current information for the planning and decision-making process for each agency. Both the IEP and the IPE include, if appropriate, a statement of interagency responsibilities detailing how such services shall be provided.

The DOR has established transition programs called Transition Partnership Projects, designed to build partnerships between LEAs and the DOR for the purposes of successfully transitioning student- consumers into meaningful employment and/or secondary education. These programs have been developed with consumer and family member participation, and closely adhere to the values of comprehensive service linkages, career development, placement in a competitive integrated environment, and reasonable accommodations. These programs serve over 17,000 consumers annually.

3. Roles and Responsibilities: The IA identifies the local school district as the lead agency responsible for providing transition services by qualified personnel to students with disabilities to the point of exit from school. The DOR is designated as the lead agency responsible for providing services by qualified personnel after the point of exit to those students meeting eligibility and order of selection requirements for VR services.

The DOR and CDE have specific responsibilities as delineated by the agencies applicable rules and regulations. These responsibilities include the provision of services as delineated, and required by the individuals individualized plan with each respective agency. In the development of these plans, both agencies staff will ensure that duplication of services, which may occur in those instances where responsibilities overlap, does not occur. In those cases, the primary responsibility for those services would rest with the most appropriate agency, as determined by the students present status and when an agency is legally obligated and funded to provide that service.

For students served by special education, the LEA has additional, specific responsibilities prescribed by the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). Under IDEA, the LEA is required to provide services the student with a disability requires to benefit from a free appropriate public education. The LEA is responsible for providing a free appropriate public education according to his/her Individual Education Plan (IEP), including transition services beginning no later than age 16. The DOR has responsibility for determining eligibility for VR services that are needed to prepare for or obtain employment. The DOR is responsible for providing and paying for the transition services agreed upon in the IPE for the period that the individual is participating in the VR program as reflected in the individual's IPE.

If the students/consumers assessed needs require the use of assistive technology in order to provide a free and appropriate public education, such equipment must be provided by the LEA for use by the student as indicated in his/her IEP or Section 504 plan, but remains the property of the state. Similarly, if the assistive technology is needed to prepare the student for the world of work, then its need must be related to the employment outcome for the transitioning student, provided in accordance with the IPE, and provided by DOR. Equipment purchased by the DOR will remain the property of the DOR until the students case is successfully closed, at which time the property is given to the student.

The LEA and DOR may develop a memorandum of understanding that includes procedures for invoicing and reimbursement of services provided or paid for by each respective agency that is determined to be the responsibility of the other.

4. Outreach: DOR implements several methods and procedures for enhancing outreach to and identification of students with disabilities in need of transition services, including those students with disabilities who qualify for assistance under §504 of the Rehabilitation Act.

Outreach at the State Level:
The IA between DOR and the CDE identifies outreach and referral procedures. Outreach procedures include students with disabilities served through an IEP, but also those who qualify for assistance under section 504.

The DOR and CDE have posted the IA on each respective Departments website. The DOR has distributed the IA to interested partner agencies and all DOR field staff in tandem with a comprehensive questions and answers memorandum addressing joint responsibilities in providing vocational services to transition age youth with disabilities, as well as the coordinated planning process necessary to facilitate the intermediate vocational objectives and long-term rehabilitation goals for DOR student-consumers as they leave school.

In an effort to support the provisions of the IA, the DOR has established a collaborative partner Advisory Committee represented by state and local partner agencies representatives, including CDE, LEAs, mental health agencies and community organizations. This Advisory Committee assists the DOR in the development of policies and procedures that promote the movement of DOR student consumers from secondary school to post-secondary school vocational and training activities. This Advisory Committee has developed list serves to their unique constituencies that allow DOR to communicate the availability of DOR programs and services. Members of the advisory groups present the availability and benefits of DOR services to students with disabilities and advocacy groups such as the Developmental Disability Council, County Mental Health Directors, and Special Education Council on the availability and benefits of DOR services to students with disabilities.

Outreach at the Local Level:
The DOR collaborates with LEAs to provide assistance and support identifying students with disabilities that may require the DOR assistance. The DOR provides local presentations to Parent/Teacher/Student Association meetings on eligibility and program services. The DOR provides VR informational literature, DVDs and other materials regarding potential services to LEAs and families. DOR assigns liaison Senior Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors to many secondary schools to provide a single point of contact for special education departments.

The DOR serves on local Workforce Investment Act youth boards to coordinate youth services and outreach strategies with Workforce Investment Act partner agencies and LEAs. The DOR maintains an active presence in community with contacts through religious and civic organizations and non-profit organizations that serve and represent students with disabilities. This includes parent resource centers, Independent Living Centers, Region Centers, and organizations that serve youth that are visually impaired or deaf or hard of hearing.

The DOR conducts various local activities such as disability awareness community job fairs, and workshops where youth with disabilities may be seeking employment supports.

Policy & Procedures:

To the extent possible, interested and eligible students should become DOR consumers before they leave high school. For students between the ages of 14 and 16, the primary role of VR will be to provide general coordination with the LEA regarding information and outreach activities about VR services for use in transition planning. Appropriate service coordination activities include resource information about VR, presentations, consultation and technical assistance, and handouts.

34 C.F.R. 361.22(a)(2) requires that students with disabilities who are eligible for VR services have properly signed IPE in place prior to the students exit from school. The DORs plans, policies and regulations clearly articulate this provision and the federal requirement that all individuals be served according to the states order of selection for services (OOS). DOR has undertaken efforts to ensure that VR transition services are provided according to state and federal requirements. Numerous directives and Questions and Answers documents have been distributed to the District Administrators clarifying transition issues. Most DOR state VR regulations have been reviewed and adapted as necessary to ensure that the regulations apply to youth and adults without regard to age. Supported employment memorandums have been sent to DOR staff to clarify supported employment services for youth.

In an effort to develop the IPE for all consumers, including eligible students with disabilities, in an expedited time frame, state regulations require an IPE to be developed within 90 days of date of eligibility for an individual who has been determined eligible to receive services from the Department and is in a priority category being served under an OOS.

To promote and facilitate coordination from the state level to the local level, the DOR and CDE identify local level administrators from their respective agencies. Each local administrator, or designee, is responsible for the coordination of transition-related activities both within his or her own agency and with other agencies. This will serve a variety of purposes, including, but not limited to, the following: coordination of resource information, outreach, program information dissemination, research and evaluation, including student follow-up studies and facilitating annual meetings of interagency personnel who serve secondary students with disabilities for the provision of transition services.

The DOR and CDE recommend and encourage the development of local MOUs, or IAs, developed at the local level to facilitate and coordinate transition services for secondary students with disabilities. State technical assistance is provided to form such agreements. At the local level, the DOR District Administrators and their staff develop MOUs, cooperative programs, and other collaborative relationships that address outreach and referral of students to the DOR. To improve the coordination of transition services between education and VR and in recognition that each DOR district and SELPA with corresponding county office of education and LEAs may have unique operational and staffing characteristics, local agencies work together to develop policies and procedures to ensure that there will not be a gap in the referral process for students who may need DOR services.

The DOR District Administrators and local education administrators identify procedures for student referrals to DOR which address the following:

· Secondary students receiving special education services in state special schools, county offices of education, and school districts.
· Secondary students with disabilities who are not receiving special education services (e.g., students served under Section 504).
· Secondary students with disabilities enrolled in court or community schools.
· Secondary students receiving special education services that are enrolled in certified, nonpublic schools.
· Secondary students served under a third party agreement (e.g., Transition Partnership Program, WorkAbility II).
· Student referral form.
· Procedures for the release of student information and designate the specific individual(s) including position, school/district, address, and telephone number who will be responsible to respond to requests for student information from the DOR.
· Establish operational procedures to manage student referrals under Order of Selection.
· Establish guidelines related to written consent.

Programs and Initiatives:

Identification of Local-Level Staff and Coordination Activities:

Qualified Personnel Responsible for Transition:
The DOR and CDE establish and maintain standards which are consistent with state-approved or recognized certification, licensing, registration, or other comparable requirements that apply to the area in which such personnel are providing special education or related services in educational agencies and in which such personnel are providing DOR VR services. In keeping with the goal of collaboration to support transitioning students, both the DOR and CDE will promote the inclusion of cross-disciplinary training through both special education and VR pre-service programs.

To the extent possible, the Rehabilitation Act calls for the provision of training to staff of other agencies as to the availability and benefits of, and eligibility standards for, VR services, in order to enhance the opportunity of individuals receiving the transition services to obtain VR services.

The DOR has provided training to SELPA Administrators on the joint and respective responsibilities of education and the VR system in the provision of transition services to youth with disabilities.

The CDE has sponsored a series of community trainings on the IDEA reauthorization, including components on transition and interagency responsibilities, attended by LEAs and DOR staff.

The DOR has established a core series of regional training and technical assistance curriculum designed for local DOR and LEA staff. Expert consultants in their respective fields provide training modules on such topics as:
· Service Provision and Planning for Transition Age Youth with Mental Illness and with Autism Spectrum Disorder;
· Benefits Planning & Management;
· Employment Preparation, Job Development & Placement; and,
· System/Program Assessment, Planning and Development

The DOR has provided training to SELPA Administrators on the joint and respective responsibilities of education and the VR system in the provision of transition services to youth with disabilities, including outreach activities. The CDE has sponsored a series of community trainings on the IDEA reauthorization, including components on transition and interagency responsibilities, attended by LEAs and DOR staff. Additionally, the DOR has established a core series of regional training and technical assistance curriculum designed for local DOR and LEA staff.

Procedures for Outreach and Identification of Students with Disabilities that Need Transition Services who are not in Special Education:
Under the Rehabilitation Act, transition services are provided to eligible students with disabilities whether or not they are receiving special education services. This includes secondary students who have a disability who receive services and/or accommodations as required by Section 504Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and ADA. This population also includes transitioning secondary students with disabilities enrolled in public programs for general education, alternative education, and adult education. These students with disabilities are not receiving special education services and, therefore, do not have an IEP. General education instructors, special education instructors, school nurses, LEA administrators, and One-Stop Programs serving youth with disabilities refer students to the DOR. Additionally, the DOR works with county foster care programs, adjudicated youth programs and county mental health to identify at-risk students that may not be identified by Special Education.

The DOR counselor will process referrals of students served under Section 504 and other students with disabilities in the same manner as those made for students served by special education.

This screen was last updated on Sep 24 2009 5:34PM by Melyssa Adams

Screen 7 of 17

State Plan for the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program
and
State Plan Supplement for the State Supported Employment Services Program

California Department of Rehabilitation State Plan for Fiscal Year 2010 (submitted FY 2009)

Attachment 4.8(b)(3) Cooperative Agreements with Private Nonprofit Organizations

The DOR has procedures for establishing written service agreements with Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRP)s, including private non-profit and for-profit VR service providers. These procedures emphasize the role of the DOR in identifying needs for specific VR services responsive to the needs of persons with significant disabilities in their areas. The procedures also emphasize the role of DOR and CRP staff in monitoring the agreements, and identifying usage and effectiveness of services provided.

The DOR has a variety of fiscal reimbursement methods with non-profit VR service providers. These include contracts, grants, fees-for-service, and rates set per regulation. For-profit providers may provide services on a fee-for-service basis. Non-financial agreements with CRPs may occur through Memorandums of Understanding.

The DOR conducts annual trainings and workshops with contract service providers, the main purpose of which is to solidify and improve collaborative relationships for the enhancement of service delivery for persons with disabilities. The major areas of discussion in the workshops include the following:

· Methods to improve the partnership through open communication,
· Strategies to formalize regularly scheduled meetings,
· Ways of improving the partners collaborative vocational activities,
· The DORs contract process, and
· Strategies to improve service provider program outcomes.

Contracts, grants, and fee-for-service agreements with CRPs are developed for the delivery of assessment, training, employment, and specialized support services. All new providers of service for DOR consumers must go through a certification and approval process. The Community Resources Development unit reviews and certifies the qualification of vendors providing services to DOR consumers in order to assure the quality of these services, as well as the safety of consumers. All VR service providers are required to maintain their CRD certification, per the DOR CRP Certification Handbook. CRPs providing work-related programs will be required to be accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities.

This screen was last updated on Sep 24 2009 6:13PM by Melyssa Adams

Screen 8 of 17

State Plan for the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program
and
State Plan Supplement for the State Supported Employment Services Program

California Department of Rehabilitation State Plan for Fiscal Year 2010 (submitted FY 2009)

Attachment 4.8(b)(4) Arrangements and Cooperative Agreements for the Provision of Supported Employment Services

The DOR identifies and makes arrangements with other state agencies to provide supported employment and extended services for individuals with the most significant disabilities. For individuals with developmental disabilities, pursuant to the Lanterman Act, California collaborates with the Department of Developmental Services, Regional Centers and CRPs to provide supported employment services. For individuals with other disabling conditions, the DOR collaborates with local county mental health agencies, CRPs, and other disability-focused agencies to provide for supported employment services. In accordance with 34 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), section 361.46 (b)(3), an Individualized Plan for Employment for consumers with an employment outcome including supported employment services must identify or describe a source of extended services.

A primary source of extended services for the DORs consumers with developmental disabilities is the Habilitation Services Program (HSP). Pursuant to the Lanterman Act, California provides a variety of services to persons with developmental disabilities through the Department of Developmental Services Regional Centers (RC) located throughout the State. Administration of the HSP was transferred from DOR to DDS effective July 1, 2004. The HSP provides extended services to DOR consumers with developmental disabilities who achieve supported employment outcomes through the DORs vocational rehabilitation (VR) program and who are eligible for HSP services. The specifics of this collaboration are detailed in California Welfare and Institutions Code Section 4850 et. seq, California Code of Regulations. The HSP also provides placement and job coaching services to RC consumers who are placed on the waiting list when they apply to the DOR for VR services under an Order of Selection.

The DOR refers to any source of extended services other than HSP as Non-Habilitation. These sources vary depending on the individuals eligibility for other programs or availability of other resources. Extended services for individuals with mental illness may be provided by county mental health agencies, which may allocate Medi-Cal Short-Doyle funds as determined by each county. Social Security Administration Work Incentives such as Impairment Related Work Expense or an approved Plan for Achieving Self Support may be used. Natural supports or private resources may also be used.

This screen was last updated on Sep 24 2009 6:14PM by Melyssa Adams

Screen 9 of 17

State Plan for the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program
and
State Plan Supplement for the State Supported Employment Services Program

California Department of Rehabilitation State Plan for Fiscal Year 2010 (submitted FY 2009)

Attachment 4.10 Comprehensive System of Personnel Development

Data System on Personnel and Personnel Development

4.10 Comprehensive System of Personnel Development
Section 101(a)(7) of the Act. 34 CFR 361.18

The Department of Rehabilitation (DOR), as the designated state agency , has undertaken the task of establishing and maintaining a Comprehensive System of Personnel Development (CSPD) designed to ensure an adequate supply of Qualified Rehabilitation Professional (QRP) personnel who perform the core counseling functions, including determining eligibility and priority for services, approving individual plans for employment, and determining successful employment outcomes.

The DOR continues to implement a strict standard for QRP counselors. On May 23, 2006, the State Personnel Board adopted minimum qualifications for QRP counselors based on national standards reviewed and approved by RSA. The minimum qualifications are the following:

· Masters degree in Rehabilitation Counseling or
· Masters degree in Counseling or a closely related field, with a graduate course that has a primary focus on Theories and Techniques of Counseling or
· Doctorate degree, with a thesis in Rehabilitation or
· Certified Rehabilitation Counselor.

In addition, in FFY 2010 the DOR will create a similar standard for Rehabilitation Supervisors.

The DOR developed and maintains a comprehensive system to collect and analyze, on an annual basis, data on qualified personnel needs and personnel development. All Senior Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors (SVRCs), SVRC QRPs, Teacher, Orientation and Mobility for the Blind, Medical Consultants, Dental Consultants, Rehabilitation Supervisors (RSs), Rehabilitation Specialists, and District Administrators (DAs) are required to submit documentation of education and certification. Data and information are maintained and analyzed by the Staff Development Section (SDS) and Operations and Accountability Office (OAO), using Microsoft Access and Excel software.

The SDS Supervisor within the Human Resources Branch serves as the Project Director for DORs CSPD Project. The OAO is responsible for the State Plan and therefore has general oversight of the CSPD and acts as the Chair of the CSPD Steering Committee. The State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) provides input to CSPD activities throughout the year.

The DOR has a CSPD Steering Committee and two subcommittees that develop, implement, and monitor comprehensive CSPD work plans. The Steering Committee, composed of the Director, Chief Deputy, other Deputies, DOR staff, and SRC representation, continue to provide overall policy guidance and direction for CSPD transitions. The subcommittees coordinate and complete specific work in specialized areas, brought forth to the Steering Committee for discussion and approval.

The subcommittees are as follows:

· The Recruitment and Retention Subcommittee collaborates with internal and external stakeholders to maximize the numbers of QRPs that enter into public vocational rehabilitation (VR) careers.

· The Retraining Subcommittee develops recommendations for the department wide retraining plan and individualized training plans for those professionals requiring retraining.

4.10(a): Data System on Personnel and Personnel Development
34 CFR 361.18 (a)

The State plan must describe the development and maintenance of a system by the State Agency for collecting and analyzing, on an annual basis, data on qualified personnel needs and personnel development.

Current Status:

As of February 28, 2009, the departments 748.5 Full-Time Equivalent (FTE) SVRC and (SVRC, QRP) positions are serving 75,000 applicants and eligible individuals with disabilities, for a ratio of counselor to applicants and eligible individuals of one to 100. Please note that FTE information references full-time and fractional positions whereas employee information tables reference individuals. This information reflects point in time rather than cumulative applicants and eligible individuals served throughout the fiscal year.

As of February 28, 2009, the departments 5 FTE Teacher, Orientation and Mobility for the Blind and 1 Permanent Intermittent position are serving 18 eligible individuals with visual impairments at the California Orientation Center for the Blind (OCB). This results in a ratio of one instructor to 3 eligible individuals. The FTE information references full-time and fractional positions whereas employee information tables reference individuals. Additionally, this information reflects point in time rather than cumulative applicants and eligible individuals served throughout the fiscal year.

As of February 28, 2009, the departments 8.6 FTE Medical Consultant positions are available to serve 75,000 applicants and eligible individuals with disabilities, for a ratio of Medical Consultant positions to applicants and eligible individuals of one to 8,720. The DORs one Dental Consultant is an intermittent employee, and therefore is not calculated as a FTE. This one Dental Consultant provides consultation, as necessary, for the 75,000 applicants and eligible individuals. This information reflects point in time rather than cumulative applicants and eligible individuals served throughout the fiscal year.

Californias 2008-2009 Budget funded 1,969.4 total DOR FTE positions (1,877.5 permanent and 91.9 temporary help). Included in this total are 820 SVRC/SVRC, QRP positions. Supporting the counseling positions were 122 RSs, 18 Rehabilitation Specialists, and 14 DAs. The Governors 2009 - 2010 Budget identifies 1,969.4 FTE positions for the DOR including 1,877.5 permanent and 91.9 temporary help positions. The Statewide Dental Consultant serves as a temporary help position, as do several Medical Consultants. Therefore, they are not included in the FTE positions.

The DOR annually serves 120,000 individuals with disabilities. As noted in Attachment 4.11(b), the DOR estimates that approximately 40,000 new applicants will be determined eligible for services during FFY 2010. The DOR does not expect significant changes in the staffing levels necessary to serve these consumers. In consideration of budget constraints and the number of expected eligible individuals with disabilities, the DOR will continue to operate under Order of Selection anticipating serving 29,000 new consumers with plan services. Of these individuals, it is forecasted there will be 20,300 consumers with most significant disabilities in Category 1 and 8,700 consumers with significant disabilities in Category 2. As of February 28, 2009, 427 eligible individuals with disabilities are on the DOR waiting list.

Table 1 reflects budgeted permanent positions within the DOR for State Fiscal Years 2008 and 2009 as well as the projected number of new appointments that will be required for each classification within the next five years.

Statewide Summary (not including temporary help positions)

Table 1:

Total FTEs 7/1/2007: Senior Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors 789.05, Rehabilitation Specialists 19.75, Rehabilitation Supervisors 125.0, District Administrators 13.9, Teacher Orientation and Mobility for the Blind 4.0, Medical Consultant 10.10, Dental Consultant 0, Total 961.80

Total FTEs 7/1/2008: Senior Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors 820.00, Rehabilitation Specialists 18.00, Rehabilitation Supervisors 122.0, District Administrators 14.0, Teacher Orientation and Mobility for the Blind 5.0, Medical Consultant 9.40, Dental Consultant 0, Total 988.40

FTEs Net Gain/Loss: Senior Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors +30.95, Rehabilitation Specialists 1.75, Rehabilitation Supervisors -3.0, District Administrators +.10, Teacher Orientation and Mobility for the Blind +1.0, Medical Consultant -0.70, Dental Consultant 0.0,Total +26.60

Filled FTEs 2/28/2008: Senior Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors 744.30, Rehabilitation Specialists 17.75, Rehabilitation Supervisors 118.0, District Administrators 13.9, Teacher Orientation and Mobility for the Blind 5.0, Medical Consultant 9.10, Dental Consultant 0.0, Total 908.05

Filled FTEs 2/28/2009: Senior Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors 748.50, Rehabilitation Specialists 17.00, Rehabilitation Supervisors 108.0, District Administrators 13.9, Teacher Orientation and Mobility for the Blind 5.0, Medical Consultant 8.60, Dental Consultant 0.0, Total 901.00

Filled FTEs Net Gain/Loss: Senior Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors +4.20, Rehabilitation Specialists -.75, Rehabilitation Supervisors -10.0, District Administrators 0.0, Teacher Orientation and Mobility for the Blind 0.0, Medical Consultant .50, Dental Consultant 0.0 Total 7.05

Projected FTEs required w/in 5 years to maintain existing allocations: Senior Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors 541.50, Rehabilitation Specialists 10.50, Rehabilitation Supervisors 67.0, District Administrators 8.60, Teacher Orientation and Mobility for the Blind 3.0, Medical Consultant 5.0, Dental Consultant 0.0, Total N/A

SVRC/ SVRC, QRP: Senior Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors and Senior Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors- Qualified Rehabilitation Professional
Rehab. Spec: Rehabilitation Specialist
Rehab. Sup: Rehabilitation Supervisor
District Admin: District Administrator / Rehabilitation Administrator II
Teacher, O & M: Teacher, Orientation and Mobility for the Blind
Med. Cons: Medical Consultant
Dent. Cons: Dental Consultant

4.10 (a)(1): Data on Qualified Personnel Needs
34 CFR 361.18(a)(1)

Personnel data projects potential retirements based on the ages of existing employees and average age of retirement. Between April 1, 2008 and February 28, 2009, 41 DOR staff retired from state service. The average age at retirement was 62 years of age with a range of 50 years to 90 years of age at retirement. As of February 28, 2009, 62% of DOR rehabilitation staff are age 50 and above and could retire within the next five years, resulting in the need for 464 SVRC/SVRC, QRPs. Using comparable data from Table 1, the DOR also projects the need to hire an additional 67 RSs, 10.5 Rehabilitation Specialists, and 8.6 DAs over the next five years. RSs and Rehabilitation Specialists are typically promoted from within the ranks of SVRCs, therefore an additional 77.5 SVRC, QRPs (67 RSs + 10.5 Rehabilitation Specialists) would be necessary within the next five years to fill positions vacated by promotion. Cumulatively, this data indicate a need for 541.5 new SVRC, QRPs (464 + 77.5) within the next five years. The DOR would additionally expect 3 Teacher, Orientation and Mobility for the Blind and 5 Medical Consultants to retire within the next five years. The DOR does not expect to have any retirements in the Dental Consultant classification.

While state civil service policies do not require employees to identify intention to retire, available DOR information provides documentation of hiring and separation patterns of SVRCs, Rehabilitation Specialists, Teacher, Orientation and Mobility for the Blind, Medical Consultants, Dental Consultants, RSs, and DAs.

At this time of national economic instability and State fiscal uncertainty, there is no firm evidence that would indicate there will be additional funding available to increase the number of consumers served in the near future. Therefore, the DOR expects the annual open caseload levels to remain the same (80,500 cases) for each of the next four years. With 760 counselors, this equates to an average of 106 cases per counselor.

[Table 2 is deleted and its data is reflected in the above paragraph.]

Due to potential personnel transitions, and CSPD goals, the DOR continues to work on the development of a new VR service delivery system to better serve individuals with disabilities. The DOR will ensure the core counseling functions, including determining eligibility and priority for services, approving individual plans for employment, and determining successful employment outcomes will be conducted by SVRC, QRPs.

Table 3 reflects the hiring and separation statistics between the dates of 4/1/2008 and 2/28/2009. This data, combined with an ongoing analysis of ages at time of separation, will assist the DOR with its succession planning and implementation.

Table 3:

HIRES

List Appointments: SVRC QRP 64, % 70, SVRC 0, % 0, Rehab Spec 3, % 75, Rehab Sup 4, % 67, RA II-Dist. Admin 2, % 100, Dental Consultant I 0, % 0, Teacher Orientation and Mobility for the Blind 0, %0,
Medical Consultant 1, %100, Totals 74, % 65

Other Appointments: SVRC QRP 28, % 30, SVRC 8, % 100, Rehab Spec 1, % 25, Rehab Sup 2, % 33, RA II-Dist. Admin 0, % 0, Dental Consultant I 0, % 0, Teacher Orientation and Mobility for the Blind 0, % 0, Medical Consultant 0, % 0, Totals 39, % 35

Total Hires: SVRC QRP 92, % 100, SVRC 8, % 100, Rehab Spec 4, % 100, Rehab Sup 6, % 100, RA II-Dist. Admin 2, % 100, Dental Consultant I 0, % 0, Teacher Orientation and Mobility for the Blind 0, %0, Medical Consultant 1, %100, Totals 113, % 100

SEPARATIONS

Resignations: SVRC QRP 17, % 31, SVRC 2, % 7, Rehab Spec 1, % 17 Rehab Sup 0, % 0, RA II-Dist. Admin 0, % 0, Dental Consultant I 0, % 0, Teacher Orientation and Mobility for the Blind 1, % 50, Medical Consultant 8, % 89, Totals 29, % 25

Retirements: SVRC QRP 15, % 28, SVRC 15 % 50, Rehab Spec 2, % 33, Rehab Sup 7, % 70, RA II-Dist. Admin 1, % 100, Dental Consultant I 0, % 0, Teacher Orientation and Mobility for the Blind 1, % 50, Medical Consultant 1, % 11, Totals 42, % 38

Other: SVRC QRP 22, % 41, SVRC 13, % 43, Rehab Spec 3, % 50, Rehab Sup 3, % 30, RA II-Dist. Admin 0, % 0, Dental Consultant I 0, % 0, Teacher Orientation and Mobility for the Blind 0, % 0, Medical Consultant 0, % 0, Totals 41, % 37

Total Separations: SVRC QRP 54, % 100, SVRC 30, % 100, Rehab Spec 6, % 100, Rehab Sup 10, % 100, RA II-Dist. Admin 1, % 100, Dental Consultant I 0, % 0, Teacher Orientation and Mobility for the Blind 2, % 100,Medical Consultant 9, % 100, Totals 112, % 100

 

Row Job Title Total positions Current vacancies Projected vacancies over the next 5 years
1 Senior Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor82072542
2 Rehabilitation Specialist18111
3 Rehabilitation Supervisor1221467
4 District Administrator1409
5 Teacher Orientation & Mobility for the Blind503
6 Medical Consultant915
7 Dental Consultant000
8
9
10

 

4.10(a)(2): Data on Personnel Development
34 CFR 361.18(a)(2)

The DOR requests data from California CORE accredited programs reflecting the number of students and expected graduates in their programs. As available, the DOR will continue to share succession planning data with the CORE accredited programs to maximize focused recruitment into graduate programs to ensure Qualified Rehabilitation Professionals reflect the diverse communities DOR serves.

Current Status:

In California, the following six state universities support CORE accredited programs leading to a Masters degree in rehabilitation counseling:

· San Diego State University (SDSU),
· California State University San Bernardino (CSUSB),
· California State University Los Angeles (CSULA) M.A. and B.A. program,
· California State University Fresno (CSUF),
· California State University Sacramento (CSUS), and
· San Francisco State University (SFSU).

Table 4a represents the number of confirmed graduates of core accredited Rehabilitation Counseling Programs during the 2007-2008 California State University academic year, enrolled students during the 2008-2009 academic year, expected graduates during the 2008-2009 academic year, and expected continuing students during the 2009-2010 academic year . This includes only pre-service students and does not include students who are current employees of DOR.

Graduates and Ongoing Students
Pre-Service California
CORE Accredited Rehabilitation Counseling Programs
Table 4a:

University:
SDSU: Confirmed Graduates Academic Year 2007-2008 37, Enrolled Students Academic Year 2008-2009 151, Expected Graduates Academic Year 2008-2009 40, Expected Continuing Students Academic Year 2009-2010 38

CSULA: Confirmed Graduates Academic Year 2007-2008 33, Enrolled Students Academic Year 2008-2009 35, Expected Graduates Academic Year 2008-2009 29, Expected Continuing Students Academic Year 2009-2010 50

SFSU: Confirmed Graduates Academic Year 2007-2008 6, Enrolled Students Academic Year 2008-2009 41, Expected Graduates Academic Year 2008-2009 8, Expected Continuing Students Academic Year 2009-2010 Currently Unknown

CSUSB: Confirmed Graduates Academic Year 2007-2008 28, Enrolled Students Academic Year 2008-2009 86, Expected Graduates Academic Year 2008-2009 34, Expected Continuing Students Academic Year 2009-2010 38, Expected Continuing Students Academic Year 2009-2010 24

CSUF: Confirmed Graduates Academic Year 2007-2008 28, Enrolled Students Academic Year 2008-2009 128, Expected Graduates Academic Year 2008-2009 29, Expected Continuing Students Academic Year 2009-2010 117

CSUS: Confirmed Graduates Academic Year 2007-2008 8, Enrolled Students Academic Year 2008-2009 27, Expected Graduates Academic Year 2008-2009 6, Expected Continuing Students Academic Year 2009-2010 31

Total: Confirmed Graduates Academic Year 2007-2008 140, Enrolled Students Academic Year 2008-2009 468, Expected Graduates Academic Year 2008-2009 146, Expected Continuing Students Academic Year 2009-2010 Minimum 260

Table 4b represents the number of confirmed graduates of Teacher, Orientation and Mobility Programs during the 2007-2008 California State University academic year, enrolled students during the 2008-2009 academic year, expected graduates during the 2008-2009 academic year, and expected continuing students during the 2009-2010 academic year. This includes only pre-service students and does not include students who are current employees of DOR.

GRADUATES AND ONGOING STUDENTS
Pre-Service California
TEACHER, ORIENTATION & MOBILITY
Table 4b:

CSULA: Confirmed Graduates 2007-2008 12, Enrolled Students 2008-2009 12, Expected Graduates 2008-2009 10, Expected Continuing Students Academic Year 2009-2010 11.

SFSU: Confirmed Graduates 2007-2008 10, Enrolled Students 2008-2009 36, Expected Graduates 2008-2009 10, Expected Continuing Students Academic Year 2009-2010 Currently Unknown

Total: Confirmed Graduates 2007-2008 22, Enrolled Students Academic Year 2008-2009 48, Expected Graduates Academic Year 2008-2009 20, Expected Continuing Students Academic Year 2009-2010 Minimum 11

 

RowInstitutionsStudents enrolledEmployees sponsored by agency and/or RSAGraduates sponsored by agency and/or RSAGraduates from the previous year
1California State Universities (6)516444162
2
3
4
5

 

4.10 (b): Plan for Recruitment, Preparation and Retention of Qualified Personnel
34 CFR 361.18 (b)

The DOR partners with the CORE accredited Rehabilitation Counseling programs to fully develop and implement CSPD pre-service and retraining plans. The DOR has a long-standing and well-established working relationship with these six CORE programs. Members of DORs leadership serve on advisory committees to each of the graduate programs and DOR employees provide guest presentations and serve as facilitators and instructors.

In 2009, the DOR hired a Department recruiter who collaborates with the six CORE programs to recruit qualified SVRC-QRP graduates. The recruiter utilizes information regarding the number of students in the BA programs to forecast available graduates in the future and develop a recruiting plan. DORs recruiter is currently focusing all of its recruiting efforts on graduate level candidates and anticipates 40 students will graduate as SVRC-QRP from the six CORE programs after 2009.

In November 2008, the Human Resources Branch Chief and the Chief of SDS attended the National Council on Rehabilitation Education/ Rehabilitation Services Administration/ Council of State Administrators of Vocational Rehabilitation Conference in Washington D.C., provided recruitment information, and discussed Californias DOR with many students in attendance.

The DOR participates on a California Health and Human Services Agency Succession Planning and Management Workgroup, which coordinates with all departments under the Agencys umbrella to identify recruitment and retention strategies. Each department then implements the activities that are most appropriate for their particular circumstances. While not solely focused on vocational rehabilitation classifications, the programs/trainings developed as a result of this group benefit the entire DOR, including VR classifications. For example, California Health and Human Services Agency departments collaborate with each other to maximize resources to conduct civil service examinations.

The SDS has also coordinated with DAs to increase awareness of recruitment activities and encourage them to make visits to CORE accredited programs and participate in on-campus recruiting opportunities.

The SDS coordinates academic activities for existing DOR staff members who choose to participate in graduate level courses to obtain a Masters degree in rehabilitation counseling. Also, the SDS provides a vital coordination link between the universities and the DOR. The SDS coordinates all DOR and FEDERALLY funded post-employment academic and training activities with universities nationwide and additionally collaborates with the six California CORE university programs as they apply for federal grant funding to further the state and federal public VR programs.

Additionally in collaboration with the SDS, the DOR Personnel Section works with the six CORE programs' points of contact to disseminate application information and vacancy notifications.

During FFY 2008, the DOR, in collaboration with the California State Personnel, developed and implemented an on-line, continuous file examination for the SVRC, QRP classification. This continuous on-line exam readies applicants who graduate throughout the academic year for vacancies. This strategy is now providing a year round applicant pool for the Department when positions become available. As a result of the implementation of on-line continuous examination for the SVRC, QRP classification, the DOR has hired 64 new SVRC, QRPs between April 1, 2008 and February 28, 2009 from this list (Table 3). There are 487 individuals on the SVRC, QRP classification examination list as of April 16, 2009.

The DOR provides an early exam option that allows individuals enrolled in their final academic year of an appropriate Masters or Doctoral Degree program to take the SVRC, QRP exam. The individual must provide proof of possession of the degree to be considered eligible for employment.

The DOR is committed to having a quality professional staff that reflects the many diverse communities served. The department actively supports DOR consumers who choose VR counseling as an employment objective. During State Fiscal Year 2008-2009, 198 DOR consumers identified an employment objective of VR counseling. Of these, 12 have successfully obtained an employment objective, 186 are ongoing consumers of the DOR, and 17 terminated services with DOR as closed, not employed. Of the 198 DOR consumers with an employment objective of VR counseling, 50 are consumers of Blind Field Services and 24 individuals indicated a primary language other than English (17 self-identifying Sign Language and 4 self-identifying Spanish, 1 self-identifying Tagalog and 2 self-identifying as other).

Table 5 identifies the race/ethnicity of consumers with vocational rehabilitation counseling as the identified employment objective based upon case record data.

Table 5:
FFY 2009 As of February 28, 2009

FFY 2009 As of February 28, 2009

Race / Ethnicity American Indian: Number of successful employment outcomes 1, Number of ongoing eligible individuals 2

Race / Ethnicity Asian: Number of successful employment outcomes 1, Number of ongoing eligible individuals 15

Race / Ethnicity Black: Number of successful employment outcomes 3, Number of ongoing eligible individuals 36

Race / Ethnicity Hispanic: Number of successful employment outcomes 0, Number of ongoing eligible individuals 39

Race / Ethnicity Multi-racial: Number of successful employment outcomes 0, Number of ongoing eligible individuals 1

Race / Ethnicity Pacific Islanders: Number of successful employment outcomes 0, Number of ongoing eligible individuals 3

Race / Ethnicity White: Number of successful employment outcomes 7, Number of ongoing eligible individuals 90

Race / Ethnicity Total: Number of successful employment outcomes 12, Number of ongoing eligible individuals 186

The DOR seeks candidates for employment who have language skills and/or cultural knowledge required to serve identified unserved and underserved populations. This is accomplished through collaboration with each of the six CORE accredited university programs and community rehabilitation programs to maximize the number of students participating in internships at DOR.

The DOR collaborates with each of the six CORE accredited programs to maximize application for and utilization of all available federal, CSPD and Long Term Training Grant funding. Participation in focused recruitment activities at the local level with community stakeholders and partners increases awareness of rehabilitation professional opportunities.

The DOR is actively involved with both national and regional recruitment and retention activities. SDS staff members represent the DOR at regional Recruitment and Retention meetings. Technical Assistance & Continuing Education Center (TACE) Region IX maintains a regional recruitment website. SDS annually attends the National Council on Rehabilitation Education Council of State Administrators of Vocational Rehabilitation (CSAVR)/RSAs annual fall conference to assure active national collaboration. DOR has presented at this event.

The DOR encourages membership of SVRCs, SVRC, QRPs, RSs, Teacher, Orientation and Mobility for the Blind, Medical Consultants, Dental Consultants, Rehabilitation Specialists, and DAs in national and state professional associations including but not limited to the National Rehabilitation Association, the American Counseling Association, the American Rehabilitation Counseling Association, and the National Rehabilitation Counselor Association. DOR also supports professional development through these organizations. The DOR provides for educational release time for Teachers, Orientation and Mobility for the Blind and provides for licensure renewal fees for Medical Consultants and Dental Consultants.

Expected Steps:

In January 2009, the DOR established a recruitment position. During FFY 2010, this position will coordinate recruitment and workforce planning efforts department-wide and specifically will:

· Develop a recruitment and retention work plan
· Continue to work with all CORE accredited rehabilitation programs to maximize recruitment opportunities into their programs and onto public VR employment.
· Work with each program to provide academic options to existing DOR SVRCs who do not currently meet the standard for SVRC, QRP.
· Coordinate with the DORs Public Information Officer to design an employee survey, which will provide the DOR with feedback on employee satisfaction with the work environment.
· Update and improve the access to the recruitment page from the DOR Internet to provide resource information on obtaining employment with the DOR.
· Coordinate the with State Personnel Board to more accurately identify the number of staff with disabilities
· Coordinate and implement paid internships, funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, for students that have either a Bachelors degree in Rehabilitation Counseling and would like to move towards a Masters degree in Rehabilitation Counseling or are currently in a Masters Program in Rehabilitation Counseling.

 

4.10(c): Personnel Standards
34 CFR 361.18(c)(1)(i)

Qualified Rehabilitation Professional (QRP) Standard:

The objective of this CSPD plan is to assure that persons with disabilities are receiving needed services provided by QRPs who are appropriately and adequately prepared and trained.

Current Status:

The DOR is in compliance with 34 CFR 361.18(c)(1)(i)

There currently are no state approved or state recognized certification, licensing, or registration requirements in California for VR Counselors as defined by 34 CFR 361.18(c)(1)(i). The DOR assertively and aggressively moved forward to propose and adopt a standard for QRP for our counselors that is consistent with 34 CFR 361.18.On March 2, 2006, The DOR received federal approval and confirmation for the proposed minimum qualifications for the California civil service SVRC, QRP job classification. On May 23, 2006 the California SPB approved the DOR proposed standard for the new California Civil Service SVRC, QRP classification. Minimum education/certification qualifications for this classification are as follows:

· Possession of a Master's Degree in Rehabilitation Counseling from a recognized institution or
· Possession of a Master's Degree in Counseling or a closely related field from a recognized institution and successful completion of one graduate course with a primary focus on the Theories and Techniques of Counseling or
· Possession of a Doctorate Degree with a specific program and doctoral dissertation with an emphasis on rehabilitation from a recognized institution and successful completion of one graduate course with a primary focus on the Theories and Techniques of Counseling or
· Possession of an active national certification as a Certified Rehabilitation Counselor.

Proof of possession of degree and successful completion of graduate course in Theories and Techniques in Counseling must be provided before an applicant can be considered eligible for appointment. There are no appointments to this classification below this standard.

There are currently state approved certification, licensing, or registration requirements in California for Teacher, Orientation and Mobility for the Blind, Medical Consultants, and Dental Consultants. Minimum education/certification qualifications for these classifications are as follows:

Medical Consultant, Department of Rehabilitation
The civil service classification for Medical Consultant, Department of Rehabilitation mandates that candidates meet the following minimum qualifications:

Possession of legal requirements for the practice of medicine, as determined by the California Board of Medical Quality Assurance or the California Board of Osteopathic Examiners, in addition to one year of experience in the practice of medicine exclusive of internship.

Applicants who are in the process of securing approval by the Board of Medical Quality Assurance or the California Board of Osteopathic Examiners will be admitted to the examination, but the Board to which the application is made must determine that all legal requirements have been met before candidates will be eligible for appointment.

Teacher, Orientation and Mobility for the Blind
The minimum qualifications for this classification are as follows:

Possession of a valid California Teaching credential authorizing the teaching of orientation and mobility to the visually handicapped, and either

I. Completion of an approved graduate curriculum leading to a Master of Arts degree in Orientation and Mobility Training or Peripatology. (Candidates who are within six months of completing the required education will be admitted to the examination, but they will not be appointed until they have completed the curriculum.)

or

II. Two years of experience working with the blind in training in mobility skills and physical conditioning. (Completion of an approved training course in the orientation and mobility in a Veterans Administration Hospital may be substituted for up to one year of the required experience on the basis of one year of training for one year of experience.) and Equivalent to graduation from college.

Dental Consultant I
Minimum qualification for the civil service classification:

Possession of the legal requirements for the practice of dentistry in California as determined by the California Board of Dental Examiners
and one year of experience in the practice of dentistry.

Applicants may be admitted to the examination prior to meeting these requirements, but the Board of Dental Examiners must determine that all legal requirements have been met before candidates will be eligible for appointment.

Proof of possession of degree and/or licensure or certification must be provided before an applicant can be considered eligible for employment. There will be no appointment to these classifications below these standards.

The DOR is in compliance with 34 CFR 361.18(c)(1)(i) for counseling classifications, Teacher, Orientation and Mobility for the Blind, Medical Consultants, and Dental Consultants.

Expected Steps:

During FFY 2010, the DOR will amend the current job specification for Rehabilitation Supervisor to meet the CSPD standard. The DOR continues to analyze current vocational rehabilitation service delivery (VRSD) system. The objective of the VRSD project is to redefine job classifications and duty statements to provide quality and effective vocational rehabilitation services and meet federal regulatory requirements. The review of current DOR Rehabilitation Supervisor job specifications is an important component of this project

Also, during FFY 2010, DOR will examine the recruitment, qualifications, and exam process for the Support Services Assistant  Interpreter classification.

Personnel Standards

To the extent that existing standards are not based on the highest requirements of the State, the steps the State is currently taking and the steps the State plans to take to retrain or hire personnel to meet standards that are based on the highest requirements of the State.

Current Status:

Table 6a provides information regarding the number of SVRCs, SVRC, QRPs, RSs, and validation status as of February 28, 2009.

The DOR validates the credential/licensure of all staff in Teacher, Orientation and Mobility for the Blind, Medical Consultants, and Dental Consultant classifications. Tables 6b, 6c, and 6d show that validation has been completed for all twenty-seven (27) staff members in these classifications, as of February 28, 2009. The DOR will continue to recruit and retain individuals that meet the state certification/licensure standards.

Table 6a: SVRC, QRP and SVRC Classifications

Validation complete: Meets SVRC, QRP Standard, Total 549

Validation complete: Does not meet SVRC, QRP Standard, but in training, Total 39

Validation complete: In training "Theories and Techniques" only, Total 0

Validation complete: Does not meet SVRC, QRP Standard, not in training, Total 171

Total: 759

Validation complete: Meets SVRC, QRP Standard: Rehab Sup. 74, Rehab Spec. 9, District Admin. 11

Validation complete: Does not meet SVRC, QRP Standard, but in training: Rehab Sup. 5, Rehab Spec. 0, District Admin. 0

Validation complete: Does not meet SVRC, QRP Standard, not in training, 361.18(c)(1)(i): Rehab Sup. 30, Rehab Spec. 8,
District Admin. 3

Total: Rehab Sup. 109, Rehab Spec. 17, District Admin. 14

Table 6b provides information regarding the number of Teacher, Orientation and Mobility for the Blind. Table 6c provides information regarding the number of Medical Consultants. Table 6d provides information regarding the number of Dental Consultants and validation status as of February 28, 2009.

Table 6b: Teacher, Mobility and Orientation for the Blind

Validation complete: Meets state certification/licensure standard, Total 7

Validation complete: Does not meet state certification/licensure standard, Total 0

Validation incomplete: review pending, Total 1

Total: 8

Table 6c: Medical Consultant

Validation complete: Meets state certification/licensure standard, Total 17

Validation complete: Does not meet state certification/licensure standard, Total 0

Validation complete: inactive-pending license renewal, Total 1

Total: 18

Table 6d: Dental Consultant

Validation complete: Meets state certification/licensure standard, Total 1

Validation complete: Does not meet state certification/licensure standard, Total 0

Total: 1

Since 2002, all SVRCs and RSs that are in good standing have had opportunities to request partial DOR sponsorship to participate in Masters degree programs in rehabilitation counseling. Annually the SDS, in collaboration with Employment Preparation Services Division (EPSD) and the Specialized Services Division (SSD), actively recruits SVRCs in good standing into CORE accredited Masters degree programs. The SDS Intranet site provides SVRCs with direct links to each CORE accredited program to provide comparative data related to application requirements, entrance exams, curriculum, and faculty.

Employees accepted into CORE accredited programs receive DOR assistance with tuition and registration fees, as funds allow, as well as up to four hours weekly towards approved academic activities. SDS coordinates all academic activities for DOR counselors obtaining graduate level During FFY 2010, of the forty current DOR employees who are participating in the Masters Degree in Rehabilitation Counseling program, the DOR provides tuition support for fourteen, which is the maximum enrollment allowed due to funding. The DOR expects 40 staff to complete their Masters Degree in Rehabilitation Counseling in the next four years.

SDS coordinates all academic activities for DOR counselors obtaining graduate level education in rehabilitation counseling at CORE accredited programs.

On March 5, 2009, the DOR conducted an e-mail survey of all Non-QRP SVRCs (171) and Non-QRP Rehabilitation Supervisors (30) to retrieve more recent data for Non-QRP counseling staff that are interested in participating in a Masters Degree Program. From this survey, 31 Non-QRP SVRCs and 3 Non-QRP RSs expressed education in rehabilitation counseling at CORE accredited programs. an interest in pursuing a Masters in Rehabilitation Counseling.

Table 7 provides information on the current 2009 employees enrolled in graduate degree programs at California State Universities and their educational status.

Summary of Retraining Activities
Master s Degree Rehabilitation Counseling
Current DOR Employees
Table 7:

University:

SDSU On Campus and Distance Learning: Number of Employees currently enrolled in Graduate Degree programs in Rehabilitation Counseling 30, Number of Employees expected to graduate May/June 2009 2, Number of Employees expected to continue after May/June 2009 28

CSULA On Campus: Number of Employees currently enrolled in Graduate Degree programs in Rehabilitation Counseling 9, Number of Employees expected to graduate May/June 2009 1, Number of Employees expected to continue after May/June 2009 8

SFSU On Campus: Number of Employees currently enrolled in Graduate Degree programs in Rehabilitation Counseling 1, Number of Employees expected to graduate May/June 2009 0, Number of Employees expected to continue after May/June 2009 1

CSUSB On Campus: Number of Employees currently enrolled in Graduate Degree programs in Rehabilitation Counseling 1, Number of Employees expected to graduate May/June 2009 1, Number of Employees expected to continue after May/June 2009 0

CSUF On Campus: Number of Employees currently enrolled in Graduate Degree programs in Rehabilitation Counseling 1, Number of Employees expected to graduate May/June 2009 0, Number of Employees expected to continue after May/June 2009 1

CSUS On Campus: Number of Employees currently enrolled in Graduate Degree programs in Rehabilitation Counseling 2, Number of Employees expected to graduate May/June 2009 0, Number of Employees expected to continue after May/June 2009 2

Totals: Number of Employees currently enrolled in Graduate Degree programs in Rehabilitation Counseling 44, Number of Employees expected to graduate May/June 2009 4, Number of Employees expected to continue after May/June 2009 40

Theories and Techniques Course Only: University, Various Universities, # of Employees, 0

Expected Steps:
As of February 28, 2009, the DOR has identified and validated that 549 (72.0%) of the 759 current SVRCs have met the SVRC, QRP standard. Individuals who meet the minimum qualifications move into the SVRC,QRP civil service classification. All new counselor appointments are made to the SVRC,QRP classification only.

As per DORs CSPD Work Plan, SVRCs who perform the core counseling functions, including determining eligibility and priority for services, approving individual plans for employment, and determining successful employment outcomes will complete the academics required by March 2018 or will have transitioned into other job tasks and duties.

The DOR will continue to encourage student participation in the SVRC,QRP exam by periodically notifying all CORE accredited Rehabilitation Counseling Masters degree programs regarding the on-line exam. Additionally, all collaborative efforts with the DORs university partners noted in previous sections of this document articulate strategies that will maximize the number of new hires who meet the SVRC, QRP standard.

The DOR will continue to encourage SVRC participation in CORE accredited Rehabilitation Counseling Masters degree programs utilizing both Distance Learning and on-campus programs. The DOR will continue to maximize and compete for all available federal dollars for this purpose.

The DOR SDS will continue to collaborate with university partners to develop and implement additional outreach strategies for existing SVRCs who require retraining and for targeted pre-service students entry into CORE accredited programs.

Based on the recommendations and priorities of the CSPD Steering Committee and utilizing available resources, the DOR will allocate additional dollars for academic retraining to assist non-QRP staff that identified an interest in additional academic coursework.

With American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 funding, the DOR will provide tuition support for existing Senior Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors, Rehabilitation Supervisors and Rehabilitation Administrators II to increase the professional capacity to provide quality services and to comply with the 2006 federally mandated Masters Degree educational requirements.

Procedure for Evaluation of Personnel Retraining Progress:
During July 2007, DOR executive leadership approved the CSPD proposed retraining priority to utilize all available funding for existing SVRCs who are currently in training to obtain their Masters degrees in Rehabilitation Counseling.

As the DOR coordinates the retraining of personnel to comply with CSPD personnel standards, the DOR closely monitors its progress utilizing methods to ensure DOR meets the 2018 deadline for total compliancy. At a minimum, on a quarterly basis the SDS CSPD coordinator monitors the academic progress of all DOR sponsored SVRCs in current retraining plans. The information is reported to the directorate and the CSPD Steering Committee to ensure that the DOR is on track to meet deadlines. Annually, a summation of CSPD activities and goals are components of the DOR State Plan CSPD attachment.

During FFY 2010, as referenced in Program Goal 1.4 regarding 4.11(c)(1), the DOR will continue its work on the VR service delivery project. Integral to this goal is the identification of appropriate tasks to be performed by remaining SVRCs who are not engaged in retraining efforts to become SVRC, QRPs. The DOR will ensure the core counseling functions, including determining eligibility and priority for services, approving individual plans for employment, and determining successful employment outcomes, are conducted by SVRC, QRPs.

 

4.10(d): Staff Development
CFR 361.18(d)

The DOR is committed to maintaining a training system that ensures all personnel receive the training and education necessary to be successful. Additionally, the DOR is committed, within available resources, to provide access to in-service training, out-service training, and internal work assignments to provide growth opportunities for personal development and advancement.

· The DORs Basic In-Service Training Grant of $334,870 ($301,553 Federal Funds, $33,317 State funds) for FFY 2009 provides for 2.0 FTE Training Officers and 1.0 FTE Associate Governmental Program Analyst position. Additionally, these funds are utilized for trainer and participant travel, facility rentals, consultant services and curriculum development to assure that rehabilitation professionals have the necessary tools and skills to serve consumers.

· The DOR was awarded an Absolute Priority In-Service Training Grant in the amount of $83,324 ($75,067 Federal, $8,257 State funds). These funds provide for 0.5 FTE Associate Governmental Program Analyst position dedicated to CSPD validation and training plan activities. Out of the Priority Grant of $83,324 , $26,958 is designated to assist with the cost of academic training for existing staff members who choose to participate in graduate level courses and/or obtain Certified Rehabilitation Counselor certification.

· In addition to federal In-Service Grant funding, the DOR budgeted approximately $400,000 for the SDS program. This funding is for 4.0 staff positions, including the Project Director for the In-Service Training Grant.

· The DOR additionally allocated $25,000 solely for tuition for Masters in Rehabilitation Counseling courses for existing staff striving to become SVRC, QRPs. These expenditures are distributed as administrative expenses under Program 40.01. in the department's budget.

· The DOR has allocated approximately $564,769 for Out-Service Training activities department wide. These funds are utilized for essential education and training not provided through in-service training activities. Due to budget constraints, only required training activities that meet mandated requirements are allowed.

Staff Development:

Annually, the SDS, in collaboration with the 14 statewide field district training coordinators, identifies existing and expected in-service training needs. All in-service training activities are scheduled based upon this needs assessment. The DOR will continue to assess the in-service training needs of existing and new employees based upon the education and certification levels of staff, responses to state and federal program reviews, emerging issues and focus upon specific succession planning needs to ensure continuity of services.

The DOR provides numerous opportunities for all staff to access significant knowledge and research through the following means:

· Invitations to participate in current research,
· The DOR Intranet,
· Professional Membership Organizations, and
· Educational opportunities (as evidenced below).

Education:

Coordination with TACE: Region IX - Pacific (Arizona, California, Hawaii, Nevada, Pacific Basin [Guam, Samoa]) at SDSU and educational institutions throughout the nation additionally provide expanded academic and certificate opportunities to develop leadership skills for SVRCs, RSs, Rehabilitation Specialists, DAs, analysts and section chiefs. Additionally, the DOR has committed resources and staff to the National Rehabilitation Leadership Institute to support on-going development of executive staff.

· The DOR has developed a multifaceted approach to supervision training to meet the needs of rehabilitation staff. In collaboration with other Departments within the California Health and Human Services Agency the group developed and customized eighty hours of mandatory supervision training curriculum. The fourth series of eighty hours of supervision training began in October 2008 and is scheduled to conclude in June 2009, at CSUS, College of Continuing Education.

· The DOR collaborated with SDSU Interwork Institute to implement a Supervisors Academy for RSs. This program is designed to increase knowledge and skills in supervision, management and leadership that will support and facilitate the mission and goals of the DOR.

· One (1) executive leader, the DOR Director, participated in (2) National Rehabilitation Leadership Institute conferences. One was held in San Diego on September 2008 and the other was held in Arlington, Virginia in February 2009. Another DOR staff participated in March 2009 NRLI held in San Diego.

· During FFY 2009, one (1) DOR Deputy Director participated in the Sierra Health Leadership Development program. Four (4) DOR mid-level managers completed the California Health and Human Services Agency Leadership Development Academy. Two (2) DOR managers are participating in the second cohort of this program during FFY 2009 and FFY 2010.

· The Chief of Human Resources and Chief of Staff Development, attended the National Conference on Rehabilitation Education/RSA conference in November 2008 held at Arlington, Virginia.

· Eleven (11) DOR staff attended CSAVR Conference in Fall 2008 held in San Diego. Five (5) were executive staff and six (6) were key DOR personnel.

· One (1) executive leader participated in The CSAVR Conference held in Maryland during the Spring of 2009.

· One (1) Deputy Director and one (1) DA attended the National Council of State Agencies for the Blind held in San Diego in November 2008.

· One (1) Deputy Director attended the Western Region Disability Conference in September 2008.

· Two (2) DOR Staff are scheduled to attend the California Transcribers and Educators of the Visually Handicap 50th Anniversary Conference in March 2009.

The DOR sponsors participants and takes a leadership role in the following two California Health and Human Services Agency succession planning academies:

· Leadership Development Academy (LDA)  This is a training for top level managers with potential to become top management within DOR. The LDA develops leadership skills over the course of a year and covers many current and relevant issues faced by staff in department leadership positions.

· Supervisors Academy  This is a training for first line supervisors which provides basic and critical skills needed to supervise an effective multi-generational and diverse staff.

In-Service Training:

SDS currently provides in-service training through core VR courses for new counseling staff and to refresh the skills of long-term staff members. Additionally, Client Assistance Program advocates are invited to participate in core training. All core counselor courses have been approved to meet the continuing education requirements for certified rehabilitation counselors. The SDS maintains training records for each employee who has participated in either in-service or out-service training.

The DOR Administrative Services Division developed and implemented a comprehensive leadership development program for its managers. SDSU Interwork Institute staff and other subject matter experts provided leadership development seminars during the months of June 2008 - December 2008. For calendar year 2009, this training has been expanded to include all Section-level management staff and above and is focused on gaining knowledge in specific areas, such as, history of the VR Program, the budget process, fiscal forecasting, contracts, hiring, discipline, and employee performance.

In early 2009, the SDS provided training presentations to the Blind Field Services supervisors entitled, Motivating Employees and Dealing with Difficult People.

During FFY 2009, the SDS designed, developed and implemented the following training courses to increase the efficiency of DOR staff performing critical functions:

· Completed Staff Work
· Maximizing Effectiveness and Organization
· Prioritizing Work Through Outlook

Counselor related in-service courses available include:

· Case Assessment and Documentation
· Client Services Management
· Diversity in the Workplace
· History and Foundation of Vocational Rehabilitation
· Interviewing Skills
· Introduction to Rehabilitation Counseling
· Mapping Rehabilitation Technology
· Medical Aspects of Disability (various subjects)
· Plan Development
· Rehabilitation Administration Manual 31
· Rehabilitation Technology
· Social Security Work Incentives
· Strategies for Successful Employment Outcomes


During FFY 2009, a new Chief of SDS was hired who will additionally serve as the project director for the In-service training grant. Due to budget cuts, the SDS was unable to hire a Training Officer with a rehabilitation counseling background, i.e., QRP. As a result, not all core classes were offered. The DOR will be addressing this need with ARRA dollars. As had been previously proposed by Employment Preparation Services Division (EPSD) and necessitated by the absence of training staff with QRP expertise, during FFY 2009, the SDS collaborated with the EPSD and SSD to develop a collaborative approach to in-service training for counseling staff. EPSD and SSD provide subject matter expertise and are supported by SDS to again offer core counselor classes. In April 2009, the SDS and EPSD & SSD conducted its first joint Introduction to Rehabilitation Counseling course delivered by two DAs.

During FFY 2009, the DOR was unable to delivery Strategies for Successful Employment outcomes in-service training due to staffing issues. The DOR will be identifying the most efficient strategies to provide staff within our existing and potential service delivery systems with the necessary training to transition our consumers to quality employment.

Expected Steps:
During FFY 2010, the SDS will conduct a needs assessment to re-evaluate DOR training needs and will prioritize training offered based upon this assessment and the strategic goals and commitments of the DOR. During FFY 2010, the SDS expects to finalize the New Employee Orientation training and disseminate to all offices throughout the state. This will ensure that each new employee is provided timely and critical information regarding the mission, goals and functional divisions within the department.

Utilizing American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 funding: the SDS will coordinate, facilitate and/or provide necessary training to educate counselors and supervisors in diversity, handling difficult consumers, supervisory skills, and medical aspects of Autism. The goal of this training is to improve staffs knowledge and abilities to better serve consumers. Additionally, utilizing ARRA funds, the DOR will be hiring a SVRC, QRP with training expertise to deliver comprehensive counselor in-service courses noted above, and a student assistant to finalize the online new employee orientation program.

Specialized Services Division (SSD) Training:

California Senate Bill 105 (SB105, Burton, 2002) established within the DOR a Division of Specialized Services, Blind and Visually Impaired and Deaf and Hard of Hearing. This legislation additionally required that the DOR establish competencies for Rehabilitation Counselors for the Blind, Rehabilitation Counselors for the Deaf and Counselor Teachers and provide continuing in-service education and in-service training. The DOR SDS collaborates with the SSD to address these needs.

In May 2008, the DOR SDS with the SSD sponsored a two-day training titled, Assisting Blind and Visually Impaired Consumers to Formulate Sound Vocational Plans. Also, in 2008, 42 Rehabilitation Counselors for the Deaf attended a training symposium on CHARGE Syndrome thru San Francisco State University. CHARGE syndrome refers to individuals with a specific set of birth defects and medical problems.Most have hearing loss, vision loss, and balance problems, which delay their development and communication.

In May 2009, the SDS in collaboration with the Division of Specialized Services, Blind Field Services developed and delivered a statewide training for its participants. This course, Effective Rehabilitation Practices, Services and Resources: Meeting the Diverse Needs of Persons with Vision Loss, meets the criteria for CA SB 105 specialized training.

Expected Steps:

Utilizing American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 funding, the DOR will provide the following:
· Sign language communication training to Support Services AssistantInterpreters to improve interpreting skills and provide improved services to employees who are deaf or hard of hearing.
· Deaf and Hard of Hearing awareness and sensitivity training to Rehabilitation Supervisors to increase awareness and understanding of issues faced by individuals who are deaf and hard of hearing.

 

4.10(e): Personnel to Address Individual Communication Needs
CFR 361.18(e)

Communication with Diverse Populations:
The DOR continues to provide effective modes of communication for staff, applicants, eligible individuals with disabilities and our community partners and stakeholders based upon individualized needs. Alternate formats include, but are not limited to: interpreters, captioning, Braille, reader services, and electronic formats. Salary incentives are provided to employees who utilize specialized language skills.

The DOR provides effective communication to persons who are monolingual or have limited bi-lingual skills in languages other than English through bi-lingual staff or contracting with spoken language interpreters. The DOR has initiated a telephonic interpretation contract as an additional resource. The contract provides for telephonic interpretation services to/from English, at a minimum for the following languages: Armenian, Cantonese, Mandarin, Cambodian, Farsi, Hindi, Punjabi, Japanese, Korean, Russian, Spanish, Tagalog, and Vietnamese. Additionally, significant forms and documents are translated into seven languages, determined annually following a statewide needs survey. The current seven languages are Armenian, Cambodian, Cantonese, Korean, Spanish, Tagalog, and Vietnamese.

Utilizing American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 funding, the DOR is purchasing Deaf-related technology including an FM system set, cochlear implant devices, and 42 new Ubi-Duo communication devices for 13 district and 29 branch offices. The DOR is implementing this new technology to facilitate increased access to DOR offices and services by deaf, hard of hearing and late deafened consumers.

 

4.10(f): Coordination of Personnel Development Under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA)
CFR 361.18(f)

The DOR and the California Department of Education (CDE) have the responsibility for providing Local Education Agencies (LEAs) and DOR staff with leadership, monitoring, and training
The DOR has provided training to Special Education Local Planning Area Administrators on the joint and respective responsibilities of education and the vocational rehabilitation system in the provision of transition services to youth with disabilities.

The CDE has sponsored a series of community trainings on the IDEA reauthorization, including components on transition and interagency responsibilities, attended by LEAs and DOR staff.

The DOR has established a core series of regional training and technical assistance curriculum designed for local DOR and LEA staff. Expert consultants in their respective fields provide training modules that include:

Transition Age Youth with Mental Illness
· Early identification of a psychiatric disability
· Access and entry to community mental health services
· Illness management
· Transition/Vocational planning and placement strategies

Autism Spectrum Disorder
· Transition supports for young adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder
· Social supports and strategies for transitioning young adults from school to work
· Natural support systems and community resources

Benefits Planning & Management
· Overview of SSI/SSDI, Medicare/Medi-Cal and TANF
· Work incentives
o PASS Plans
o Impairment Related Work Experience
o Student Earned Income Exclusion
o Ticket to Work
· Benefits management strategies

Employment Preparation, Job Development & Placement
· Career/Job development
· Self-marketing strategies
· Tracking contacts and follow up

System/Program Assessment, Planning and Development
· Assessment of current interagency collaborations and partnerships
· Special needs and resource issues of rural communities
· Best Practices/Development of a collaborative process

DOR provides cross-training to LEAs utilizing multiple strategies. DOR Districts designate SVRC liaisons to school districts to inform and support educators on DOR services and application processes. DOR participates in regional trainings, annual kick-off meetings and/or teacher in-service trainings with school districts. DOR provides informational pamphlets on DOR services to agencies providing youth services including schools, One-Stop Centers, Regional Centers and county mental health facilities. DOR is represented on many Workforce Investment Act youth boards with educators to ensure timely and coordinated services to youth with disabilities. DOR participates in local job fairs where youth with disabilities are seeking employment opportunities.

This screen was last updated on Sep 28 2009 2:44PM by Nadia Hoshovsky

Screen 10 of 17

State Plan for the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program
and
State Plan Supplement for the State Supported Employment Services Program

California Department of Rehabilitation State Plan for Fiscal Year 2010 (submitted FY 2009)

Attachment 4.11(a) Statewide Assessment

The California Department of Rehabilitation (DOR), jointly with the California State Rehabilitation Council (SRC), is completing a comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment Program (SNAP) over the next three (3) years to satisfy federal requirements and comply with Section 101 (a)(15)(i) of the Rehabilitation Act.

This attachment includes
1) Part A, a summary of the first year results of SNAP, and
2) Part B, "Section 2: Public Comment On State Plan Policies And Procedures"

Part A
Summary of SNAP, Year 1 Federal Fiscal Year 2009:

As part of the SNAP, the DOR completed an analysis of the DOR's consumer demographic data by comparing it to other existing data sets available from the US Census, the California Department of Finance (DOF), the Social Security Administration, and various statewide education and social services entities. The purpose of the analysis was to identify individuals with disabilities who are potentially unserved or underserved by the DOR, in order to serve or better serve them.

Available data have been limited, and thus there is no precise measurement as to what extent individuals with disabilities in California are being unserved or underserved. In addition, the scope and integrity of the data that were reviewed are subject to the methodology that each source collected and entered their information, which may not directly compare to the DORs consumer demographic data or may skew the data.

The following findings emerged after the DOR caseload data were compared to existing state and federal data:

1. Based on race/ethnicity data, Asian Americans are proportionally underrepresented in the DORs caseload. Although the data also show a disparity with Hispanics/Latinos, the DORs methodology of data entry needs to be assessed as the data entry resulted in a consumer undercount.
2. Based on Social Security beneficiary data, individuals with disabilities may be most underserved in six (6) California counties: Sacramento, San Bernardino, San Joaquin, Fresno, Stanislaus, and Kern.
3. Based on type of disability data, the DOR consumers who are below parity compared to national RSA figures are represented in three impairment groups (Communicative, Physical, and Psychological) within seven (7) counties: Sacramento, San Bernardino, Contra Costa, Los Angeles, Monterey, San Francisco, and Solano.
4. From Findings 2 and 3, Sacramento and San Bernardino counties emerge as potentially the two most underserved counties.
5. Based on a comparison of data by county population and corresponding caseload size, there is no correlation between the population size of a county and the proportion of potentially underserved individuals with disabilities. Therefore, no general conclusion can be made about rural or urban counties being unserved or underserved based upon these findings.
6. California schools have been experiencing a dramatic increase in the number of students with autism. The DOR will track this data to determine if this increase will result with a commensurate number of consumers with autism when these students become age-eligible for the DOR services.

Methodology:

The DOR establishes that the terms need and unserved or underserved, require defining, as the Rehabilitation Act (Act) does not provide specific guidance on defining these terms, and therefore provides flexibility to states to establish their own definition. In this phase of the DORs SNAP, the DOR definition of these terms is identified in general terms. The DOR compared its caseload data with existing databases and identified disparities between the compared sets of data. When the DOR caseload data were proportionally less than the comparable, other existing data, the DOR identified this type of disparity as potentially demonstrating need or identifying potentially unserved or underserved populations. The DOR consciously uses the term potentially since the DOR could not definitively prove that the identified populations were in need, or were unserved or underserved, as the populations in the existing data sets could not be verified as being eligible for vocational rehabilitation services under existing eligibility criteria from the Rehabilitation Act. In fact, the DOR assumes that many to most of the individuals counted in the non-Rehabilitation Service Administration (RSA) data are not eligible. Conversely, these existing data sets are the best available data that the DOR could use to compare them with the DORs caseload.

The DOR specifically chose to gather and examine statistics on race/ethnicity, Social Security beneficiaries, population by county location, and types of disabilities (major impairments).

1. Race/Ethnicity - Since the Rehabilitation Act explicitly identifies minorities as traditionally underserved populations; the analysis compared the DOR's caseload data on race/ethnicity to California DOFs (State of Californias department responsible for developing the Governors budget, based upon cost, revenue, and demographic estimates) race/ethnicity data.
2. Location by County - Since the SRC raised the question on whether individuals with disabilities in Californias rural communities were unserved or underserved, data were examined by county, even though the term rural is also not defined in the Rehabilitation Act. The DOR analyzed the population size of counties to represent rural (small) and urban (large) counties, rural being lower-populated counties. The DOR requested data on the number of Californians receiving benefits from the Old-Aged Survivors, and Disabilities Insurance Program (OASDI  Social Security Administration) and compared the proportion of beneficiaries to the proportion of the DORs caseload in Californias 58 counties.
3. Type of disabilities (major impairments) - The DOR requested data on types of disabilities by impairment and compared caseload data in California with identical national data from RSA.

Findings:

The DOR examined five (5) general data sources, including disability population statistics through the American Community Survey (ACS) by the US Census, Cornell University, and the National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP), to assist in identifying the extent that individuals with disabilities are potentially being unserved or underserved in California. The five sources are represented as follows:

1. Existing disability population statistics (ACS, Cornell University, and NCCDPHP)
2. State-level statistics from other federal programs (Social Security Administration and RSA)
3. State and local data and reports (California Departments of Finance and Education)
4. Stakeholder input (Consumer Satisfaction Survey)
5. Other Resources (Other RSA-identified sources)


I. Use of existing disability population statistics:

A. ACS & Cornell - Disability Data:

The DOR examined disability data from 1) the American Community Survey (ACS), a US Census Bureau survey designed to replace the decennial census long form and 2) Cornell Universitys 2007 Disability Status Report (Cornell). Since estimates in the Cornell report are based on ACS data, the data from both sources are comparable. However, the data are not identical, since ACS and Cornell University (ACS/Cornell) based their data on different parameters.

Data from ACS/Cornell focused on the prevalence of disability among non-institutionalized working-age people in California in 2007. Respondents were asked about long-lasting physical, mental, or emotional conditions. Results show that:

1) 10.5% to 10.9% of Californians reported one or more disabilities.
2) Among the six (6) types of disabilities identified, the highest prevalence rate was "Physical Disability," between 6.0% and 6.5% of Californians.
3) The Sensory Disability category (the only other type of disability that can be compared to the DOR and RSA impairment categories) showed that the prevalence rate was 2.2% and 2.3% of the total population, from ACS and Cornell, respectively.

Most of the ACS/Cornell data do not compare to the DOR caseload data due to disparate definitions of the disabilities categories in the ACS/Cornell data compared to the nineteen (19) reported impairments in the DOR and RSA data. For example, there are no impairment categories that compare with ACS/Cornells categories entitled with a self-care disability, a go-outside-home disability, and employment disability.

There are only two categories in which ACS/Cornell data can be compared with the DOR caseload: Physical Disability and Sensory Disability. However, the ACS/Cornell data do not distinguish if these individuals with physical or sensory disabilities have already received services over their lifetime from the DOR, if they are considered closed DOR cases, or if they do not qualify for services based upon other DOR and RSA eligibility criteria.

Physical Disability: ACS/Cornell track Physical Disability as a separate category as does RSA and the DOR. However, RSA and the DOR specifically break down this category into seven (7) impairments, including Mobility, Manipulation, Respiratory, etc. In comparing the data, it suggests that the DOR serves individuals with physical disabilities more than their proportion from the ACS/Cornell data. 24.67% of the DOR caseload has been identified with physical impairments. The ACS/Cornell data find that 6% and 6.5% of all Californians between 18 to 64 years of age identified as having a physical disability, respectively.

Sensory Disability: The category Sensory Disability from the ACS/Cornell data resembles the DOR and RSA data related to eight (8) visual and hearing impairment categories. The comparable ACS/Cornell data include blindness, deafness, or a severe vision or hearing impairment, in a single category. The resulting data indicate that individuals with sensory disabilities comprise 11.53% of the DOR caseload. The ACS/Cornell data find that 2.2% and 2.3% of all Californians between 18 and 64 years of age identified as having a sensory disability, respectively.

B. National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (Center) - Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) Data

The DOR also examined disability data from BRFSS. The Center manages the BRFSS, which tracks adults who are limited in any activities because of physical, mental, or emotional problems.

17.5% of adult Californians were reported in 2005 as limited in any activities because of physical, mental, or emotional problems. In 2006, no California data were available from BRFSS. In 2007, 16% of adult Californians were reported as limited in any activities because of physical, mental, or emotional problems.

Since the BRFSS report consolidates three types of disabilities, (physical, mental, or emotional), and does not further identify comparable impairments to those recorded through the DOR caseload data, the DOR does not compare its caseload data to the BRFSS report and limits its findings to exclusively the BRFSS data.

II. State-level statistics from other federal programs:

A. Social Security Administration - Old Age, Survivors, and Disability Insurance Program (OASDI) Data:

Using 2007 Social Security Administration data reported by the California Department of Social Service, the DOR compared the number of OASDI beneficiaries by county with the DORs 2007-08 total caseload by county. The OASDI data were used as it most closely compared to the characteristics of the DOR caseload data, except OASDI beneficiaries older than 62 years old can be beneficiaries solely because of their age. Similarly, other beneficiaries may be survivors and not individuals with a disability.

Results indicate that of Californias 58 counties, 35 counties (or 60.3%) have a lower percent of the DOR county caseload than the percent of OASDI county beneficiaries. Of these 35 counties, there are six (6) top-ranking, potentially underserved counties in California. Counties include Sacramento, San Bernardino, San Joaquin, Fresno, Stanislaus, and Kern. These six counties ranked high since they had the greatest percentage difference between the DOR caseload and California OASDI beneficiaries.

The 35 potentially underserved counties include counties of all sizes, from small counties like Alpine with a population of 1,344 to large counties like Riverside with a population of over 2.1 million. Thus, there is no correlation based upon the size of a county, a surrogate measure for a rural or urban county, to generalize that individuals with disabilities in small counties or large counties, as a whole, are potentially underserved.

B. RSA - Types of Disabilities (Major Impairments) Data:

The number of the DOR's vocational rehabilitation cases for Federal Fiscal Year (FFY) 2008 was compared to the number of RSA's nationwide vocational rehabilitation cases for FFY 2008. This comparison was done across five (5) major impairment groups established by RSA: Visual, Communicative, Physical, Cognitive, and Psychological.

The data show that California is in close, but not identical, parity with RSA's nationwide percentages when serving the five major impairment groups. California falls slightly below parity in three of the major impairment groups: Communicative, Physical, and Psychological disabilities. Conversely, California is slightly above parity in two major impairment groups, Cognitive and Visual.

In addition, there are seven (7) counties in California where the percentage of consumers is mostly below parity, based on impairment: Contra Costa, Los Angeles, Monterey, Sacramento, San Bernardino, San Francisco, and Solano counties. These seven counties fall below nationwide parity in the same three impairment groups: Communicative, Physical, and Psychological disabilities.

III. State and local data and reports

A. DOF and the DOR - Race/Ethnicity Data

The DOR conducted an analysis on demographic data by race/ethnicity. The data from the DOR consumer caseload included all consumers by their race, as defined by RSA, which includes American Indian, Asian American, Black/African American, Pacific Islander, White, and multi-race. To obtain the number of Hispanic/Latino consumers, the DOR identified those consumers whose ethnicity is Hispanic. Therefore, the number of consumers whose race was identified as White and ethnicity as Hispanic were identified as Hispanic, while the balance was reported as White. Consumers whose race/ethnicity were identified as unknown were not reported, to avoid skewing the percentages.

The DOR used DOF 2008 demographic estimates, which are based upon a combination of sources, including the 2000 US Census, births, deaths, in-migration, and out-migration. The DOR compared this data to the DORs demographic caseload for State Fiscal Year 2007-08.

Asian Americans are the least proportionally represented race in the DORs caseload, where Asian Americans are 4.3% of the DORs caseload and 11.8% of Californias population. Similarly, the percentage of Hispanics/Latinos are proportionally underrepresented in the DORs caseload, 25.3%, compared to their population proportion in California, 36.2%. However, due to the change in the reporting methodology for Hispanics/Latinos as an ethnicity and not a race, the DOR is reviewing the reliability and identified undercount of the data. Specifically, for a consumer to be identified as Hispanic/ Latino, the data must be entered twice, with only the race being a required entry, compared to only one entry being required for all the races.

Conversely, Black/African American consumers comprise 18.6% of the DORs caseload compared to 5.9% of Californias population, followed by White consumers who comprise 47.9% of the DORs caseload compared to 43% of Californias population. Pacific Islanders are represented proportionally higher in the DORs caseload, 1%, compared to being .4% of Californias population. American Indians and multi-race populations are almost proportionally identical.

B. California Department of Education (CDE) - Autism and Acquired Traumatic Brain Injury Data

The DOR examined data on individuals with autism from the CDE and Acquired Traumatic Brain Injury (ATBI) from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Autism:
According to the most recent statistics from CDE, there was a 109.2% increase in the number of students with autism from 2000-01 to 2004-05. In this 4-year period, the number of students with autism (from birth to age 22) increased from 14,039 to 29,370. With this significant increase in a relatively short amount of time, the DOR might expect a progressive, corresponding increase in individuals with autism seeking services.

Acquired Traumatic Brain Injury (ATBI)
In their 2006 Facts about Traumatic Brain Injury report, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimated that at least 5.3 million Americans (nearly 1.8% of the US population estimates of 2005-07) had a long-term or lifelong need for help to perform activities of daily living as a result of a Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI). CDC further reported that approximately 1.4 million people sustain a TBI each year in the United States.

Autism and ATBI:
During FFY 2009, the DOR reviewed caseload data from FFY 2006, FFY 2007, and FFY 2008 to determine the number of new applicants with ATBI or autism. Between FFY 2006 and FFY 2007, there was a 21% increase in the number of applicants with autism and a decrease of 7% in the number of applicants with ATBI. Between FFY 2007 and FFY 2008, there was a 39% increase in the number of applicants with autism and an increase of 17% in the number of applicants with ATBI.

The DOR is collaborating with the California Departments of Developmental Services and Education to prepare for the possible increase in service needs of transitioning age youth with autism spectrum disorders.

IV. Consumer Satisfaction Survey:

The DOR administers a Consumer Satisfaction Survey (CSS) that asks consumers in various stages of their plan trajectory to appraise the quality and effectiveness of the services they receive. The DORs 2009 Consumer Satisfaction Survey (CSS) was distributed to consumers in February 2009. The survey, developed jointly by the DOR and SRC, used the same questionnaire format and procedures as were used in 2008, as directed by the SRC, except there was an increase of 1,000 consumers who were mailed the survey for a total of 4,000 consumers.

For more details on the CSS, see the evaluation of Program Goal 1.2 in attachment 4.11(e)(2).

V. Other Resources:

The DOR examined other data resources, which can assist with research on individuals with disabilities. However, these resources provide information that can support service delivery, in general, but do not provide statistical data useful for identifying needs of individuals with disabilities in California or identifying individuals with disabilities who are unserved and underserved. Thus, data from these sources are not included in this report.

Strategies for addressing the findings in SNAP are found in subsection (1)(B) of Attachment 4.11(d).

The DOR will gather further data during the next phase of the Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment to validate the following:
1. Individuals with disabilities may be most underserved in six (6) California counties (Sacramento, San Bernardino, San Joaquin, Fresno, Stanislaus, and Kern given that these counties had the greatest percentage difference between the DOR caseload and California OASDI recipients.
2. The DOR consumers are below parity compared to national RSA figures in three impairment groups (Communicative, Physical, and Psychological) and more evident within seven (7) counties: Sacramento, San Bernardino, Contra Costa, Los Angeles, Monterey, San Francisco, and Solano.
3. The DOR will utilize the data from the comprehensive statewide needs assessment (SNAP) as another variable in setting priorities for personnel allocations.

Part B
Section 2: Public Comment On State Plan Policies And Procedures:

Description of Activities:
The Department of Rehabilitation (DOR) and the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) organized and sponsored four public meetings to obtain public input on:
· The draft 2010 State Plan Update for Title I, Vocational Rehabilitation Services and Title VI, Supported Employment Services;
· Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment (SNAP); and
· The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA).

The DOR consolidated the three projects in order to increase the quantity, quality, and diversity of the public input.

The four public meetings were designed to maximize input from a broad range of stakeholders; therefore the public meetings did not include interactive discussions like typical focus groups. The input from these meetings are intended to assist in SNAP, Year 2 efforts, beginning October 1, 2009.

To increase the quality of the public input, the DOR provided guidance and background in its public notice to assist the public in focusing their comments. The public notice was widely disseminated and was in accordance with the public notice provisions of Californias Open Meeting Act, State law governing public meetings.

Cumulatively, there were 70 speakers and 244 individuals in attendance at public meetings. Fifty-one (51) public comments were submitted in writing; 32 reflecting public input of speakers and 19 reflecting public input not received at public meetings.

With guidance for speakers in the public notice, the testimony primarily focused on 1) the draft 2010 State Plan Update, 2) five (5) comprehensive statewide needs assessment questions, and/or 3) recommendations for ARRA expenditures. In addition, there was a diversity of viewpoints representing all the identified service delivery areas.

Summary of Input received:
During the Public Input process, no individual identified errors of fact within the Draft 2010 State Plan Update. As a result of all the public comments, contributors identified one or more of the following: 1) populations they perceive as unserved/underserved, 2) expected trends in three to five years, and 3) issues related to the following major areas:

1. Collaboration and cooperatives, identifying the issues related to education and mental health cooperative programs and interagency and intergovernmental collaborative efforts;
2. Comprehensive system of personnel development, identifying issues related to training, recruitment, and retention of rehabilitation professionals;
3. Supported Employment services, identifying specific types of services to enhance outcomes;
4. Specialized services, identifying needs and importance for deaf, hearing impaired, blind, visually impaired, deaf/blind, and blind/deaf consumer services and improving the Business Enterprise Program;
5. Independent Living, identifying services and staffing needs.
6. Workforce development, identifying the services, needs, and challenges in securing employment in the workforce development infrastructure;
7. Assistive technology, understanding and identifying the importance of assistive technology;
8. Transitional Partnership Projects, identifying the value of partnerships between local educational agencies the DOR to successfully transition student consumers.
9. Miscellaneous, including, but not limited to, bureaucratic challenges and information systems services

In each of the aforementioned project areas, the public was given the opportunity to comment on identified needs and recommendations for ARRA expenditures. The DORs expenditures decisions are consistent with them (see attachment 4.11 (d)).

The DOR staff and Administration are currently evaluating public comments and recommendations for further consideration to be implemented, as resources allow. Year 2 of SNAP (FFY 2010) will result in a comprehensive report that identifies preliminary needs to better serve individuals with disabilities, to be developed with the SRC, which will also:

· Identify the extent to which issues are being addressed by the DOR.
· Identify issues that are within and outside the DOR's purview.
· Identify other issues that did not emerge at the public meetings.
· Assist in the development of the DOR goals, objectives, performance measures, and strategies for the State Plan and coordinate a linkage between them.

Year 3 of SNAP (FFY 2011) may include a comprehensive survey to stakeholders, so that quantitative data can be gathered, identifying specific programmatic needs to better serve individuals with disabilities, to the extent resources permit.

The DOR is utilizing the data of SNAP Year One (FFY 2009) to assist the department determine how best to allocate staffing resources throughout the state. Additionally, the DOR Diversity Workgroup is utilizing this information as it develops recommendations. During FFY 2009, the DOR established a recruitment position to assist with the recruitment of hard to fill positions. Data developed through FFY 2009 is being utilized to target recruitment efforts when resources allow. Preliminary Year 2 SNAP data (obtained through public meeting process) has been shared with the Executive Leadership of the department.

The design of the SNAP Year 3 (FFY 2011) will adhere to Federal requirements and structured in consideration of the options delineated by the federal Rehabilitation Services Administrations project examining different model Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessments.

This screen was last updated on Sep 24 2009 7:47PM by Melyssa Adams

Screen 11 of 17

State Plan for the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program
and
State Plan Supplement for the State Supported Employment Services Program

California Department of Rehabilitation State Plan for Fiscal Year 2010 (submitted FY 2009)

Attachment 4.11(b) Annual Estimates

The Department of Rehabilitation (DOR) has developed the following estimates for Federal Fiscal Year (FFY) 2010:

Approximately 40,000 new applicants will be determined eligible for services. Of that number, approximately 26,300 new consumers will receive plan services under Part B of Title I of the Act. Approximately 2,700 will receive plan services under Part B of Title VI of the Act. Additionally, approximately 400 consumers previously on the waiting list will receive plan services with funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) of 2009.

The DOR currently operates under an Order of Selection (OOS). Of the 29,400 new consumers to receive plan services, the DOR estimates:
· Approximately 20,300 will be consumers with the most significant disabilities in Category 1,
· Approximately 8,700 will be consumers with significant disabilities in Category 2, and
· Approximately 400 will be consumers with disabilities in Category 3. (Category 3 plan services will be funded by ARRA).

The DOR annually serves approximately 120,000 individuals with disabilities. During FFY 2010, 29,400 new consumers are expected to receive plan services. The DOR expects to provide plan services to 80,500 previously determined-eligible individuals with disabilities.

The average cost per plan under Part B of Title I of the Act is projected to be $4,600. Under Part B of Title VI of the Act, the projected average cost per plan is $6,800.

Through OOS, DOR estimates the service cost for the individuals with the most significant disabilities (Category 1) at approximately $125.2 million, for the individuals with significant disabilities (Category 2) at approximately $53.7 million, and for the individuals with disabilities (Category 3) at approximately $600,000.

The OOS policy for the DOR states that the DOR will continue to serve individuals with the most significant disabilities first, then those with significant disabilities, and then those with disabilities. If the DOR cannot serve individuals who are eligible, it will place them on the statewide waiting list. This policy is utilized to insure that individuals who are the most significantly disabled have priority for services.
RowCategoryTitle I or Title VI FundsEstimated Number to be ServedAverage Cost of Services
1:Consumers with the most significant disabilities$125,200,00084,000$1,490
2:Consumers with significant disabilities$53,700,00036,000$1,491
3:Consumers with disabilities$600,000400$1,500
Totals$179,500,000120,400$1,490

This screen was last updated on Sep 24 2009 6:54PM by Melyssa Adams

Screen 12 of 17

State Plan for the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program
and
State Plan Supplement for the State Supported Employment Services Program

California Department of Rehabilitation State Plan for Fiscal Year 2010 (submitted FY 2009)

Attachment 4.11(c)(1) State Goals and Priorities

All but one of the goals and priorities for Federal Fiscal Year (FFY) 2010 are the same as last year. The State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) and the California Department of Rehabilitation (DOR) have jointly decided to maintain our goals with one modification. FFY 2009 Program Goal 1.4: Improve the recruitment and retention of qualified rehabilitation professionals has been updated to reflect more comprehensive workforce development and succession planning goals and objectives. FFY 2010 Program Goal 1.4 now reads: The DOR will develop and implement efficient and effective workforce development and leadership succession plans.

Analysis: The DOR, in collaboration with the SRC, continues to analyze our existing infrastructure, systems and human resources within the context of our existing budgetary challenges. Together the DOR and SRC have identified overarching goals that will provide continuous improvement of Californias vocational rehabilitation (VR) program.

During FFY 2009, the DOR executive leadership has engaged in substantive strategic planning efforts resulting in the adoption of a draft Strategic Plan. The program and supported employment goals identified in this state plan update are consistent with the DORs strategic plan. The DORs Deputy Directors and District Administrators actively participated in the review of the Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment Project (SNAP) data analysis and the subsequent development of program and supported employment program goals, performance measures and strategies.

During FFY 2009, the DOR has made substantive progress on existing strategic initiatives, including the Vocational Rehabilitation Service Delivery System (VRSD), Electronic Records System (ERS), and initiatives regarding DOR infrastructure. Since these initiatives seek to cost-effectively improve processes, they are linked to increasing the effectiveness and efficiency of the vocational rehabilitation services delivery (Goal 1.2), including the development and implementation of efficient and effective workforce development and leadership succession plans as an integral element of the VRSD initiative (Goal 1.4). Furthermore, it is expected that the initiatives will increase the quality and quantity of employment outcomes (Goal 1.1). Each of these major strategic initiatives will continue in FFY 2010.
The State Plan Update Program Goals are consistent with the RSA Standards and Indicators. The DORs goal to increase the quality and quantity of employment outcomes (Program Goal 1.1) reflects RSA Indicators 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4 and 1.5. Specific State Plan Measurable Objectives further reflect the importance of these standards. The DORs goal to increase the effectiveness and efficiency of vocational rehabilitation services delivery (Program Goal 1.2) is expected to result in increased achievements on standards and indicators. In DORs strategies to carry out activities to identify and serve individuals with the most significant disabilities who are minorities, 4.11 (d) (2), DOR examines RSA Standard 2.1 on minority background service rate. Furthermore, the DOR regularly applies the methodology of the RSA Standards and Indicators with its caseload data. The DOR has successfully passed the RSA Standards and Indicators for FFY 2006, 2007 and 2008 and expects to pass them in FFY 2009. The DOR State Plan Update Goals sharpen the focus of the RSA Standards and Indicators as well as recommendations from the SRC.
Results of the California Statewide Needs Assessment (SNAP):
The DOR began its triennial Statewide Needs Assessment Program (SNAP) for October 2008 through September 2011. The first year of the assessment includes a comparative analysis of DORs caseload data and existing data sets from various sources. This Phase 1 was conducted from October 2008 through March 2009. The following findings emerged after DOR caseload data were compared to existing State and Federal data:

1. Based on race/ethnicity data, Asian Americans are proportionally underrepresented in DORs caseload. Although the data show a disparity with Hispanics/Latinos, DORs methodology of data entry needs to be assessed in order to draw any conclusions, as it preliminarily appears that there is an undercount of Hispanics/Latinos.
2. Based on Social Security recipient data, individuals with disabilities may be most underserved in six (6) California counties: Sacramento, San Bernardino, San Joaquin, Fresno, Stanislaus, and Kern.
3. Based on disability data, DOR consumers may be underrepresented in three impairment groups (Communicative, Physical, and Psychological) within seven (7) counties: Sacramento, San Bernardino, Contra Costa, Los Angeles, Monterey, San Francisco, and Solano.

These preliminary findings will be further validated through Phase 2 of SNAP, in which statewide focus groups will be conducted. Findings from these focus groups will be documented and a written report will be available in FFY 2010.

Discussion of SRCs input:

During their February 2009 work team meeting, members of the SRC Planning Work Team provided comments and feedback related to DORs Vocational Rehabilitation and Supported Employment goals. Of specific interest were Program Goals 1.3 and 1.4.
During their March 2009 quarterly meeting, the membership of the SRC approved the proposed vocational rehabilitation and supported employment program goals and performance measures.

As a result of the cumulative review and analysis, the DOR commits to continuing the DORs Program Goals from the 2009 State Plan Update, as amended and align resources and activities toward successful implementation of them.

See attachment 4.11(d) for further analysis and discussion of strategies to achieve these goals.

Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) Services Program Goals:

Goal 1.1: The DOR will increase the quality and quantity of employment outcomes.

Goal 1.2: The DOR will increase the effectiveness and efficiency of vocational rehabilitation services delivery.

Goal 1.3: The DOR will increase the number of SSI/SSDI beneficiaries
at or above Substantial Gainful Activity.

Goal 1.4: The DOR will develop and implement efficient and effective workforce development and leadership succession plans.

Goal 1.5: The DOR will increase equality for persons with disabilities
through systems change.

Supported Employment (SE) Services Goals:

Goal 2.1: The DOR will increase competitive, integrated employment opportunities for consumers accessing SE services.

Goal 2.2: The DOR will enhance DOR staff knowledge of SE Regulations and processes by providing training and technical assistance.

Goal 2.3: The DOR will promote and enhance collaboration with local and statewide SE partners and stakeholders.

See Attachment 4.11 (c) (4) for the Supported Employment Goals.

Innovation and Expansion Program Goals:

The mission of the ERS project is to procure an electronic case recording system that will result in increased counseling time with consumers, decreased redundancy and data entry, and improved consumer services, while meeting RSA requirements.

The goal of procuring a new ERS is to improve the accessibility, effectiveness and efficiency of the Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) Services Program and provide field, program and executive management with more accurate and timely information for monitoring, oversight, planning and reporting purposes.

This screen was last updated on Jun 19 2009 7:54PM by Melyssa Adams

Screen 13 of 17

State Plan for the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program
and
State Plan Supplement for the State Supported Employment Services Program

California Department of Rehabilitation State Plan for Fiscal Year 2010 (submitted FY 2009)

Attachment 4.11(c)(3) Order of Selection

Since 1995, the Department of Rehabilitation (DOR) has operated its vocational rehabilitation services program under an Order of Selection (OOS) process. The DOR is operating under its OOS process in State Fiscal Year 2010(July 1, 2009  June 30, 2010), as requests for DOR services are expected to exceed budgetary resources.

 

Under its OOS process, DOR continues to serve individuals with the most significant disabilities first (Priority Category 1), then those with significant disabilities (Priority Category 2), and then lastly those with disabilities (Priority Category 3).

Most significantly disabled is defined by California Code of Regulations (CCR) §7051( C ) as an eligible individual who has a serious limitation in terms of an employment outcome in at least four functional capacity areas; whose vocational rehabilitation can be expected to require multiple vocational rehabilitation services and can be expected to require an extended period of time and who has one or more physical or mental disabilities resulting from amputation, arthritis, autism, blindness, burn injury, cancer, cerebral palsy, cystic fibrosis, deafness, head injury, acquired traumatic brain injury, heart disease, hemiplegia, hemophilia, HIV infection, respiratory or pulmonary dysfunction, mental retardation, mental illness, multiple sclerosis, muscular dystrophy, musculo-skeletal disorders, neurological disorders (including stroke and epilepsy), spinal cord conditions (including paraplegia and quadriplegia), sickle cell anemia, specific learning disability, end-stage renal disease, or another disability or combination of disabilities determined on the basis of an assessment for determining eligibility and vocational rehabilitation needs to cause comparable substantial functional limitation.

Significantly disabled is defined by CCR §7051(B) as an individual who has a serious limitation in terms of an employment outcome in at least one functional capacity area, whose vocational rehabilitation can be expected to require multiple vocational rehabilitation services and can be expected to require an extended period of time and who has one or more physical or mental disabilities resulting from amputation, arthritis, autism, blindness, burn injury, cancer, cerebral palsy, cystic fibrosis, deafness, head injury, acquired traumatic brain injury, heart disease, hemiplegia, hemophilia, HIV infection, respiratory or pulmonary dysfunction, mental retardation, mental illness, multiple sclerosis, muscular dystrophy, musculo-skeletal disorders, neurological disorders (including stroke and epilepsy), spinal cord conditions (including paraplegia and quadriplegia), sickle cell anemia, specific learning disability, end-stage renal disease, or another disability or combination of disabilities determined on the basis of an assessment for determining eligibility and vocational rehabilitation needs to cause comparable substantial functional limitation.

"Disabled" is defined by CCR §7051(A) as an individual who has no serious limitation in terms of an employment outcome in any functional capacity area; or whose vocational rehabilitation is not expected to require multiple vocational rehabilitation
services; or whose vocational rehabilitation is not expected to require an extended period of time.

 

Under its OOS process, the DOR will provide services in the following order:

Priority Category 1: Individuals with the most significant disabilities
Priority Category 2: Individuals with significant disabilities
Priority Category 3: Individuals with disabilities

 

Estimates for FFY 2010:
DOR operates under Order of Selection (OOS), of the 29,400 new consumers expected to receive plan services in FFY 2010, the DOR estimates:
· Approximately 20,300 will be consumers with the most significant disabilities in Category 1,
· Approximately 8,700 will be consumers with significant disabilities in Category 2.
· Approximately 400 will be consumers with disabilities in Category 3 (Category 3 plan services will be funded by ARRA).

If DOR cannot serve all individuals who are eligible, it will place them on a statewide waiting list. DOR ensures that those eligible individuals who do not meet the order of selection criteria will have access to services provided through information and referral pursuant to CCR §7037. The waiting list is reviewed annually to assure that services are being provided on a statewide basis and that the determination of priority category does not bar or discriminate against any eligible individual based on the factors specified in CCR §7050(b).

The OOS Policy is utilized to insure that individuals who are the most significantly disabled have priority for services. The policy was last changed in State Plan 2003 to significantly streamline and shorten the time required to assess priority status of individual consumers.

Between July 1, 2009 - June 30, 2010, the DOR will provide the full range of services to those individuals with the most significant disabilities regardless of application date; to those with significant disabilities who apply for services on or before June 30, 2010; and, with ARRA funds, to those with disabilities who applied on or before May 1, 2009.

The OOS Declaration for State FY 2009-2010 is as follows:

DECLARATION OF ORDER OF SELECTION FOR VOCATIONAL

REHABILITATION SERVICES

Whereas, on August 18, 1995, the Department of Rehabilitation (Department) first declared that the Department was under an Order of Selection for Vocational Rehabilitation Services and determined that no priority categories could then be served, and,

Whereas, on June 11, 2009, the Departments Director declared that projected resources were not adequate to serve all categories and that resources were adequate to serve individuals with the most significant disabilities, regardless of application date, as well as individuals with significant disabilities, who applied on or before June 30, 2010, and that both categories would be served effective July 1, 2009, and,

Whereas, on June 22, 2009, the Department was authorized to expend one time American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) funds to assist individuals with disabilities, especially those with the most significant disabilities, to prepare for,
obtain and maintain employment; and to make an investment in the future to increase the capacity to generate outcomes, and,

Whereas, the Department has reviewed projected resources and projected costs for this next fiscal year, as provided by Title 9, California Code of Regulations, Sections 7052, and has determined that projected resources continue to be inadequate to meet all the projected costs of applicants and that projected resources remain sufficient only to continue to serve those individuals with the most significant disabilities, regardless of the application date; individuals with significant disabilities who apply on or before June 30, 2010, and, with ARRA funds, individuals with disabilities who applied on or before May 1, 2009.

Now, therefore, I, Anthony Tony P. Sauer, Director of the Department of Rehabilitation, declare that effective July 20, 2009, the Department shall serve those priority categories that include those individuals with the most significant disabilities, also known as Category One, regardless of the date of application, those individuals with significant disabilities, also known as Category Two, who apply on or before June 30, 2010, and those individuals with disabilities, also known as Category Three, who applied on or before May 1, 2009.


Dated: June 30, 2009 Original Signed by Director Sauer

_________________________
ANTHONY TONY P. SAUER
DIRECTOR
Priority CategoryNumber of individuals to be servedOutcome goals 26sOutcome goals 28sTime within which goals are to be achievedCost of services
184,0009,4458,464SFY 2010 (ending 6/30/10)$125,200,000
236,0004,0483,627SFY 2010 (ending 6/30/10)$53,700,000
3400211189SFY 2010 (ending 6/30/10)$600,000
4
5
6
7
8
9
10

This screen was last updated on Sep 16 2009 9:04PM by Melyssa Adams

Screen 14 of 17

State Plan for the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program
and
State Plan Supplement for the State Supported Employment Services Program

California Department of Rehabilitation State Plan for Fiscal Year 2010 (submitted FY 2009)

Attachment 4.11(c)(4) Goals and Plans for Distribution of Title VI, Part B Funds

The DOR utilizes all funding provided under Section 622 of the Act for the provision of Supported Employment (SE) services for eligible individuals. Individuals provided with SE services:
· Are eligible for vocational rehabilitation services,
· Are determined to be individuals with the most significant disabilities, and
· Have selected SE as the appropriate employment outcome, following a comprehensive assessment of rehabilitation career and job needs.
SE services include situational assessment, job placement, and job coaching.

For State Plan 2010, it is expected that DOR will expend all funds made available under Section 622. It should be noted, that Title VI, Part B Funds only make up 8.7% in FFY 2008 and FFY 2009 of the DORs annual commitment of resources for SE programs that serve the most significantly disabled consumers. In addition to the funds available under Section 622, the DOR utilizes Title I funds as necessary to meet the needs of individuals with the most significant disabilities who are determined, based on the above criteria, to be eligible for SE services.

The DOR goals and priorities for the distribution of funds received under Section 622 of the Act for Supported Employment are:

Supported Employment Goal 2.1: The DOR will increase competitive, integrated employment opportunities for consumers accessing SE services.

Supported Employment Goal 2.2: The DOR will enhance DOR staff knowledge of SE Regulations and processes by providing training and technical assistance.

Supported Employment Goal 2.3: The DOR will promote and enhance collaboration with local and statewide SE partners and stakeholders.

This screen was last updated on Jun 19 2009 7:58PM by Melyssa Adams

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State Plan for the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program
and
State Plan Supplement for the State Supported Employment Services Program

California Department of Rehabilitation State Plan for Fiscal Year 2010 (submitted FY 2009)

Attachment 4.11(d) State's Strategies

The Department of Rehabilitation (DOR) has established the following Vocational Rehabilitation and Supported Employment program goals, performance measures and strategies for Federal Fiscal Year (FFY) 2010.

Section I: Vocational Rehabilitation Program Goals, Performance Measures and Strategies

Program Goal 1.1: Increase the quality and quantity of employment outcomes.

Objective 1.1.1:
The Department of Rehabilitation (DOR) will increase the number of employment outcomes and earnings ratios during FFY 2010.

Performance Measures to be achieved:
1.1.1.1. During Federal Fiscal Year (FFY) 2010, the DOR will maintain or increase successful employment outcomes by one (1) over FFY 2009 as evidenced by RSA Standard 1.1.
1.1.1.2. During FFY 2010, the DOR will increase the number of consumers who identify employment as their primary source of income at successful closure in competitive employment by 1% over FFY 2009.
1.1.1.3. During FFY 2010, the DOR will increase the earnings ratio of all individuals in competitive employment by 0.5% over the FFY 2009.
Strategies:
· The Workforce Development Section (WDS) continues to provide support and coordination for the implementation of the Executive Order State as a Model Employer in conjunction with partner agencies, including the development of an action plan and detailed steps for the future.
· The WDS will continue development and implementation of MOU with Veterans Affairs to maximize resources for veterans with disabilities to assist them with returning to work.
· National Employment Team (NET): The Assistant Deputy Director of Collaborative Services and the WDS Section Manager coordinate Californias response to NET activities.
· In conjunction with the current District Employment Coordinators, WDS will increase District support via a single point of contact for each district for dissemination of information, partnership building and employment information.
· The DOR will continue staff support of the Youth Leadership Forum to increase the knowledge of available resources and advocacy issues for Transition Age Youth.
· The DOR will continue to work in partnership with the Department of Developmental Services on a pilot project, which is part of the Governor's Executive Order S04-05, to help increase the number of individuals with disabilities working in state service. An entry-level job examination that targets individuals with developmental disabilities has been implemented to provide an entrance into state service.
· The DOR will continue to work in close partnership with the Department of Developmental Services and the First Lady's "We Include" Initiative to increase the employment rate of people with developmental disabilities in the state of California.
· The DOR will continue to work in partnership with the Department of Developmental Services on the student internship/work experience project for Transition Age Youth with developmental disabilities.  This project allows for high school students to intern at state offices.
· The DOR Districts will develop relationships with local Chambers of Commerce, Rotary Clubs, and other employers to increase employment outcomes for DOR consumers.
· The DOR Districts will continue to collaborate with local Workforce Investment Boards and associated One Stop Centers to develop linkages with their employers.
· The DOR will strive to ensure there is an adequate number of Community Rehabilitation Providers (CRPs) to meet the service needs of our consumer population, with particular consideration given to language and cultural diversity needs.
· Additional district strategies may include but not be limited to: NET program activities; expansion of job placement circle activities; development of on-the-job training opportunities; active participation in job fairs; employer consortiums; and monitoring of high-cost, long-term cases.

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) -funded Strategies:
Utilizing ARRA funding, the DOR will:
· Expand provision of services to provide consumers with increased opportunities for on-the-job training to facilitate direct job placement opportunities with minimal costs to the business/employer.
· Develop and enhance statewide partnerships with Small Business Development Centers to increase the number of employment outcomes in self-employment settings.
· Improve the marketing of services to employers, improve outreach to people with disabilities, including historically unserved and underserved populations, and enhance internal and external corporate communications to increase the quantity and quality of employment outcomes.

Objective 1.1.2:
Business Enterprises Program (BEP) will assist vendors to improve their earnings to a level that will provide adequate income for them and return on investment to the Program.

Performance Measures to be achieved:
1.1.2.1 During FFY 2010, eight (8) DOR consumers will identify employment as their primary source of income at successful closure in BEP vending facilities.
1.1.2.2 During FFY 2010, 60% of all BEP vendors operating vending facilities for 12 months will earn an average monthly net income of $3,300.
Strategies:
· The BEP will close at least 3 (three) low-performing locations and will place vendors into more lucrative ones.
· The BEP will revamp its new-vendor training program to increase vendor competitiveness in todays market.
· The BEP will provide business coaching and intensive training to all current vendors.
American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) -funded Strategies:
Utilizing ARRA funding, the DOR will:
· Purchase and utilize computer software to improve effective and efficient monitoring of BEP vendor activities. This software will assist vendors in providing accurate reporting and improve DORs technical assistance and monitoring.
· Establish seven (7) new high use BEP vending sites in California to maximize BEP opportunities for vendors. These sites will have been well researched for viability and will be utilized as new sites for existing vendors and/ or sites for new vendors.

Program Goal 1.2: Increase the effectiveness and efficiency of DOR vocational rehabilitation services delivery.

Objective 1.2.1:
The DOR will increase efficiencies in Individual Plan for Employment (IPE) Development, effectively measure consumer satisfaction and evaluate current DOR service delivery system.

Performance Measures to be achieved:
1.2.1.1 During FFY 2010, 80% of eligible individuals able to be served by DOR will have their IPE developed within 90 days of date of eligibility determination or removal from the waiting list.
1.2.1.2 During FFY 2010, 70% of respondents to the Consumer Satisfaction Survey (CSS) will cumulatively respond that they either strongly agree or agree with the statement, "I am satisfied with the services from the Department of Rehabilitation."
1.2.1.3 During FFY 2010, the DOR will continue to develop and implement a strategic plan to re-evaluate the current DOR vocational rehabilitation service delivery (VRSD) system.
Strategies:
· The DOR is developing record of service management and fiscal monitoring tools that will be utilized by districts to ensure effective and efficient service delivery, including the monitoring of long-term cases.
· The State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) will review all CSS data and analysis and provide recommendations to the DOR to improve service delivery.
· As identified in the VRSD work plan, subject matter experts, including personnel and budget staff, will analyze VRSD proposals.
· Executive Leadership will adopt a VRSD proposal for implementation.
· The DOR will coordinate appropriate review of proposed VRSD by internal and external stakeholders and control agencies including but not limited to: the State Rehabilitation Council, Bargaining Units, California State Personnel Board and the Department of Personnel Administration.
American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) -funded Strategies:
Utilizing ARRA funding, the DOR will:
· Complete the Bandwidth Improvement Project. This project will upgrade end of life hardware and increase available bandwidth for the data communication lines and equipment in the Central Office and field offices, which will improve the DOR network response. This will enhance and enable efficiencies in the implementation of the Electronic Record Systems Project.
· Redesign and update content for the current DOR Intranet website. The goal is to ensure that DOR staff has access to the latest information and content via the Intranet. Information will be easily accessed and available in one place, thereby reducing duplication and maintenance of information on the DOR network.
· Implement Video Conference functionality within Central Office and 3 DOR locations statewide. Video conferencing will introduce new and robust technology to provide training and meetings to DOR staff. This will create more productivity in the workplace and provide more efficient services to DOR consumers, stakeholders, and business partners.
· Develop a new Community Resource Development database to facilitate informed choice. The new database will provide the DOR with a methodology for tracking provider performance data; be web enabled to allow consumers to rate CRPs and view other consumer ratings; and allow for a seamless transition of information to the Electronic Records System.
· Begin physical improvements to the Orientation Center for the Blind (OCB) facility in Albany, California. The improvements will increase the capacity, quality, and effectiveness of the services for Californians who are blind or visually impaired to more effectively prepare them for independent living and employment.
Program Goal 1.3: The DOR will increase the number of Supplemental Security Income (SSI)/Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) beneficiaries at or above Substantial Gainful Activity (SGA).

Objective 1.3.1:
The DOR will increase the number of DOR SSI/SSDI beneficiary consumers at or above SGA and will provide training and technical assistance to maximize access to and understanding of Social Security Administration (SSA) work incentives.

Performance Measures to be achieved:
1.3.1.1 During FFY 2010, the DOR will increase the number of SSI/SSDI beneficiaries earning at or above SGA by 1% over FFY 2009.

1.3.1.2 During FFY 2010, the DOR, with partners, will provide 10 training/technical assistance sessions for the DOR staff, community partners and other stakeholders related to the utilization of Social Security Administration (SSA) work incentives, on-line benefits planning tools and calculators.
1.3.1.3 During FFY 2010, 150 DOR, mental health, education and stakeholder staff will receive Benefits Planning and Management training.

Strategies:
· The DOR Collaborative Services Section will continue to convert best practices identified during the life of the Bridges Transitions grant to departmental practices.
· CRPs and DOR staff will assist consumers in accessing and navigating the www.disabilitybenefits101.org website to decrease concerns regarding the impact of employment on benefits.
· The DOR will ensure that all Senior Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors (SVRCs) are aware of linkages available through Work Incentives Planning and Assistance (WIPA). SVRCs will orient consumers to these benefits planning resources, as appropriate.
· Mental Health Interagency Agreements (IAs) include expectations of training and technical assistance related to benefits planning.
· Department of Education IAs include training and technical assistance related to benefits planning.
· The DOR will continue to coordinate Ticket to Work activities with the SSA and its Program Managers, Maximus & CESSI (Cherry Engineering Support Services, Inc) and partner agencies.

Program Goal 1.4: The DOR will develop and implement efficient and effective workforce development and leadership succession plans.

Objective 1.4.1:
Establish data sources upon which to make business decisions related to recruitment and retention.

Performance Measure to be achieved:
1.4.1.1 During FFY 2010, the DOR will establish at least 1 (one) new data source/baseline for assessing employee retention.
Strategies:
· The DOR will design and implement a tool to further enhance turnover data, which will identify why Qualified Rehabilitation Professional staff leave DOR, to assist with the development of retention strategies.
· The DOR Human Resources staff will coordinate with the Public Information Officer to design an employee survey, which will provide the DOR with feedback on employee satisfaction with the work environment.
· The DOR Human Resources staff will implement a tool to monitor the number of DOR employees by classification that are near retirement age and review the data every six months to focus efforts on workforce planning.

Objective 1.4.2:
Improve the recruitment and retention of Qualified Rehabilitation Professionals (QRP).

Performance Measure to be achieved:
1.4.2.1 During FFY 2010, the DOR will amend the California civil service Rehabilitation Supervisor job specification.
Strategies:
· The DOR will provide recruitment information to all CORE Accredited Rehabilitation Counseling Programs and appropriate Masters degree programs that graduate potential candidates for the SVRC, QRP classification.
· The DOR Human Resources Branch Manager and the Staff Development Section (SDS) Chief will collaborate with graduate students, education partners and RSA at annual National Commission on Rehabilitation Education (NCRE), Council of State Administrators of Vocational Rehabilitation (CSAVR), and RSA conferences to directly recruit students in attendance and to learn and exchange ideas regarding recruitment.
· The DOR will explore various methods to increase diversity to meet the needs of DORs consumer base through collaboration with the six CORE accredited university programs and community rehabilitation programs.

*Additional comprehensive goals and objectives are outlined in Attachment 4.10, CSPD.

Program Goal 1.5: Increase equality for persons with disabilities through systems change.

Objective 1.5.1:
The DORs Independent Living & Assistive Technology (ILAT) and Disability Access Sections (DAS) will support systems change activities.

Performance Measures to be achieved:
1.5.1.1 During FFY 2010, the DORs Disability Access Section (DAS) will provide at least 30 training sessions to California Departments and Agencies regarding employment law and architectural and program access.
1.5.1.2 During FFY 2010, the DOR will participate in the annual Golden Guardian testing exercise providing technical assistance and support to mass care and shelter of persons with disabilities.
1.5.1.3 During FFY 2010, the DOR, as a standing member, will participate in four (4) meetings of the Governors Emergency Operations Executive Council providing technical assistance and consultation to ensure the emergency planning, preparedness, mitigation and recovery strategies account for and address the needs of persons with disabilities.
Strategies:
· The DAS, via an Interagency Agreement, will provide 3 training sessions to state government regarding reasonable accommodation requirements.
· Via Interagency Agreements, the DOR DAS will survey other state departments and agencies to identify physical and programmatic access deficiencies. The DOR DAS will provide written reports of findings and recommendations.
· The DOR will participate in 4 planning meetings to include numerous departments within the California Health and Human Services Agency, the SILC, the Red Cross and other interested parties to develop the [California Essential Function shelter annex to the states emergency plan] to guide mass care shelters in providing for the inclusion of persons with disabilities in general shelters during evacuations.
· The DOR will participate in the annual meeting of the private Partnership. The DOR provides technical assistance and consultation to ensure needs of persons with disabilities are appropriately provided for and included in the advice to the Secretary of the California Emergency Management Agency. This strengthens the states emergency management efforts utilizing public-private partnerships.
· The DOR will actively participate with the Governors California Emergency Management Agency Disaster Preparedness and Recovery drills to identify and problem solve physical and program access barriers for individuals with disabilities.

Section 2: Title VI B SE Program Goals, Performance Measures and Strategies.

SE Goal 2.1: Increase competitive, integrated employment opportunities for consumers accessing SE services

Objective 2.1.1
The DORs SE program will maximize access to competitive, integrated employment opportunities.

Performance Measures to be achieved:
2.1.1.1 During FFY 2010, at least 54% of successful SE outcomes will be individual placements in integrated employment.
2.1.1.2 During FFY 2010, the DOR will increase the number of SE individual successful employment outcomes (status 26) compared to FFY 2009 by 1%.
Strategies:
· DOR district staff will continue to collaborate with CRPs, Regional Centers, local educational agencies, the Veterans Administration, mental health agencies and other community partners to provide training and technical assistance regarding independent living and job readiness skills necessary for successful SE placement.
· The DOR will continue to encourage DOR district, CRP and Regional Center and mental heath program staff to utilize individual placements rather than group placements as appropriate.
· The DOR will evaluate data from mandatory reviews of closed cases for SE consumers earning less than minimum wage at closure to identify potential readiness for competitive placement.
· The DOR will work with SE service providers to increase the number of group placements at or above minimum wage.


SE Goal 2.2: Enhance staff knowledge of SE regulations by providing training and technical assistance to staff.

Objective 2.2.1
The DORs SE staff will have necessary tools and technical assistance that are developed using research-based practices and a variety of modalities.

Performance Measures to be achieved:

2.2.1.1 During FFY 2010, the DOR will coordinate and implement two (2) regional VR WAP and Supported Employment liaison teleconferences with DOR staff. This group shall include but not be limited to staff serving individuals with developmental, mental health and brain injury disabilities.
2.2.1.2 During FFY 2010, the DOR will develop and disseminate training related to serving individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders, utilizing appropriate training methodologies that include case studies.
Strategies:
· The DOR statewide SE coordinator will disseminate and provide technical assistance to Supported Employment liaisons including trend reporting, case studies, and research-based guidance.
· Supported Employment liaisons in each DOR district will serve as internal resources providing technical assistance to SE counselors.
The DOR will continue to post Supported Employment research and web resources on the DOR Intranet (the discussion forum and bulletin board) and will begin development of a Supported Employment Intranet page that will include resources for non-habilitation funded Supported Employment.

SE Goal 2.3: Promote and enhance collaboration with local and statewide SE partners and stakeholders.

Objective 2.3.1
The DOR will collaborate with SE partners and stakeholders to maximize opportunities for applicants and eligible individuals accessing supported employment services.
Performance Measures to be achieved:
2.3.1.1 During FFY 2010, the DOR will hold four (4) meetings, on a quarterly basis, with the California Department of Developmental Services (DDS), the Department of Veterans Affairs, and mental health organizations to promote and enhance collaboration.
2.3.1.2 During FFY 2010, the Workforce Development Section will hold monthly meetings with DDS to enhance employment opportunities and expand linkages to business partners.
Strategies:
· Each DOR District Administrator will continue to designate at least one staff member to serve in the capacity as Supported Employment liaison.
· The DOR SE coordinator will encourage DOR districts to participate in local stakeholder meetings.
· The DOR will develop methodology and survey instrument(s) for assessing collaboration effectiveness by the end of FFY 2010.

Section 3: Innovation and Expansion Goal, Performance Measures, and Strategies
The DOR has established the following Innovation and Expansion Goal for FFY 2010:

Innovation and Expansion Goal 3.1: Electronic Records System (ERS)
Objective 3.1.1
The DOR has set aside a portion of funds allotted under Section 110 of the Act to replace its outdated mainframe system with a new ERS. The new ERS will be a commercial-off-the-shelf application that will improve accessibility, effectiveness and efficiency of the VR services program for individuals with disabilities.

Performance Measures to be achieved:
3.1.1.1 The DOR will successfully complete the system design and interfaces by April 2010.
3.1.1.2 The DOR will successfully complete the user acceptance testing by May 2010.
3.1.1.3 The DOR will begin to implement a two-month pilot in two (2) districts by August 2010.
Strategies:
· The DOR will nominate and select field and administrative staff by July 2009 to participate in the design and development of the new ERS.
· The DOR will procure the infrastructure needed at the Department of Technology Services to host the ERS by November 2009.
· The DOR will conduct business process re-engineering activities to maximize the functionality to be provided by the new ERS by January 2010.
· The DOR will select and train up to 50 staff to provide ERS training to pilot users and remaining users by May 2010.
· The DOR will hold monthly Executive Steering Committee meetings to inform executive management and the SRC of project activities and progress.

4.11(d)(1)(A): Strategies to provide a broad range of assistive technology services and assistive technology devices.

The DOR employs multiple strategies to ensure that a broad range of assistive technology services and assistive technology devices are available to applicants and consumers of DOR services at all stages of the vocational rehabilitation process.

1. The DORs State regulations and policy support availability of assistive technology and services, including training on the use of assistive technologies, at all stages of the vocational rehabilitation process.
a. California Code of Regulations (CCR) Sections 7001.05, 7002, 7002.5, 7024.4, 7029 clearly define availability of services and devices for applicants and consumers.
b. DOR Rehabilitation Administrative Manual Chapter 30 provides technical policy for SVRCs, including guidance related to assistive technology assessment, provision and training.
c. Welfare and Institutions Code Section 19096(d)(6) provides for technical assistance to the department related to the assistive technology needs of blind and visually impaired and deaf and hard-of-hearing consumers.
2. Utilizing ARRA funding, the DOR is purchasing Deaf-related technology including an FM system set, cochlear implant devices, and 42 new Ubi-Duo communication devices for 13 district and 29 branch offices. The DOR is implementing this new technology to facilitate increased access to DOR offices and services for deaf, hard of hearing and late deafened consumers.
3. The DOR ensures that Senior Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors (SVRCs) have access to technical assistance and training related to the assessments for and provision of a broad range of assistive technology services and devices.
a. The DOR employs an Assistive Technology Coordinator, housed within the Independent Living and Assistive Technology Section to provide resources, technical assistance and guidance to SVRCs.
b. SVRCs receive comprehensive information and training related to assistive technology as noted in Attachment 4.10. Assistive technology assessment, provision and resources are covered in the following in-service training: Introduction to Rehabilitation Counseling, Rehabilitation Technology and Mapping Rehabilitation Technology.
c. Rehabilitation Counselors for the Blind and Rehabilitation Counselors for the Deaf receive specialized training on assessment of client needs for assistive technology and the latest assistive technology for the populations which they serve through annual trainings mandated by the Sections 19096(d)(4) and 19096(d)(6) of the California Welfare and Institutional Code.
d. Technical tools and resources are available on DORs Internet site and internal computer share drives to ensure that SVRCs have access to relevant resources and information.
4. The DOR ensures that applicants and consumers receive assistive technology information in multiple formats including orientation videos and sessions, the consumer information handbook and counseling sessions.
5. Applicants and consumers are assured rights and remedies for decisions made by DOR, including assistive technology decisions. These rights and remedies are provided to applicants and consumers throughout the life of their case through the Client Information Handbook and forms provided to the applicant/consumer.

4.11(d)(1)(A): Strategies to provide assistive technology services and devices to individuals with disabilities on a statewide basis.

The DOR provides statewide leadership in the provision of assistive technology services and devices for all Californians with disabilities. The California Assistive Technology System (CATS) is a statewide project that promotes access to assistive technologies, related services, and information to enable people with disabilities to be successful, independent and productive. Information regarding all CATS programs and initiatives is available on DORs public Internet site.
CATS is authorized and funded under the Assistive Technology Act of 1998, as amended in 2004. CATS provides leadership to a comprehensive set of programs to meet the assistive technology (AT) needs of Californians, including but not limited to leadership for the AT Network, and activities.
The DOR contracts for substantive programs including AT Device Loan Program (Try before you Buy), AT Reutilization Program (Want Ad Posting), AT and Transportation Loan Guarantee programs and leadership development activities to ensure that Californians with disabilites are informed of and have access to these important programs.
AT Network: In addition, Welfare and Instiutions Code 19801(d) and 19806(g) also supports the AT Network. Originally created in 2000, the AT Network is contracted out through the DOR. The AT Network is expanding the accessibility of tools, resources and technology that will help increase independence, improve personal productivity, and enhance the quality of life for all Californians. Californians can access information and referral assistance from the AT Network via telephone and through comprehensive web-based resources at http://www.atnet.org/.
The AT Network provides information, referrals, training, and technical assistance to those who share an interest in and commitment to the practical and effective use of technology by people with disabilities. These services are primarily provided through independent living centers throughout the state.
Utilizing ARRA funding:
· The DOR will use AT evaluation vans to provide critical AT evaluation services throughout California. The AT vans expand the DORs ability to evaluate and identify appropriate accessible technology needs of consumers and for DOR employees with disabilities that need reasonable accommodation to retain employment.
· The DOR will upgrade the Mobility Evaluation Program van to expand staff ability to identify and evaluate appropriate accessible technology needs of consumers.

4.11(d)(1)(B): Strategies to carry out outreach activities to identify and serve individuals with the most significant disabilities who are minorities.

The DOR identifies and implements effective strategies to better serve individuals with disabilities, including those with the most significant disabilities who are members of Californias multicultural population.

As evidenced by DORs performance on RSA Standard 2.1 in FFY 2008, there was 99% equity for accessing services for minority groups in California.

During FFY 2009, the DOR Planning Unit completed an analysis of the DOR's consumer demographic data, including race/ethnicity, by comparing it to other existing data sets (please see Attachment 4.11(a), Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment, for details).

During FFY 2009, the percentage of African Americans, American Indians, and Pacific Islanders applying for DOR services exceeded their respective population percentages in California. The percentage of Hispanic applicants has been increasing and is approaching the percentage of the Hispanic population in California. The percentage of Asian Americans applying for DOR services remains less than their percentage of the State population.

The DORs San Jose and San Joaquin Valley districts have continued to partner with the Center for Education and Training (CET), recipient of a Rehabilitation Services Administration grant, to serve migrant farm workers. This project involves bilingual Spanish counselors from these two districts. A special project code is being used to track new farm workers who are accessing the DOR and CET services. Similar benefits (financial aid, Workers Compensation, State Disability Insurance, and etc.) are being utilized to maximize opportunities for these consumers.

The DOR believes the following strategies will continue to assist the DOR in meeting outreach goals.

Strategies:
· The DOR's Diversity Workgroup will utilize the results of Statewide Needs Assessment Project (SNAP), Year 1 to recommend outreach strategies to serve identified minorities and other individuals with disabilities from counties that are proportionally less served than other counties. In addition, the DOR hired a full-time recruiter to address recruitment of qualified staff, including counselors who are bilingual and/or capable of addressing the potential growth of cases in Acquired Traumatic Brain Injury (ATBI) and autism. It is expected that the recruiter will coordinate recruitment efforts to hire staff as positions become available in these economic times.
· The DOR Public Information Officer will be developing communication strategies to improve outreach to unserved and underserved communities and may benefit employee recruitment and retention, recognizing the results of SNAP.
· The Electronic Record System (ERS) Project staff will examine computer-programming designs so that consumer characteristics can be entered with greater accuracy upon implementation of the new ERS, as identified through the SNAP.
· The DOR will continue to strengthen its efforts to serve Asian Americans with disabilities by partnering with Asian American communities, including continuation of the Asian Taskforce established by the DOR in the northern and southern regions to increase the quality of services for Asian Americans with disabilities.
· The DOR will continue to partner with local agencies that serve monolingual populations to enhance services that are provided to these individuals including services to Asian Americans and Hispanics.
· The DOR will continue to promote use of the telephonic interpreting service for those offices that do not have bilingual Senior Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor, Qualified Rehabilitation Professionals (SVRC, QRPs) on staff and ensure printed and electronic public information is provided in multiple languages.
· The DOR will continue to enhance the cultural competency of all staff in order to effectively serve Californias multicultural population and recruit SVRC, QRPs to mirror the community they are serving. During FFY 2009, several employees have attended Diversity training offered by the State Personnel Board. The DORs Staff Development Section is in the planning process to be able to provide Diversity courses to staff throughout the State in FFY 2010. The course is designed to provide information to staff that will increase their ability to communicate and work with individuals from diverse backgrounds.
· The DOR will continue to establish and or participate in collaborations and partnerships with businesses and professional groups statewide that represent diverse populations including Asian Americans and Hispanics.
· The DOR will collaborate with the American Indian Advisory Council in partnership with the Native Hope International Pow Wow through the Annual Native American Resources Summit to improve Native American VR Services.

4.11(d)(1)(B): Strategies to identify and serve individuals who have been unserved or underserved by the VR program.

In addition to the strategies identified to above, the DOR and SRC will collaborate to utilize the following strategies to identify and serve individuals who have been unserved or underserved by the VR program, including minority populations, individuals with ATBI and individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (please see Attachment 4.11(a), Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment).

· The DOR District staff will continue discussions with Local Workforce Investment Boards to compare census data to populations served.
· The DOR will continue to increase collaboration to provide vocational rehabilitation services for returning veterans, including consumers with ATBI. The DOR will continue development and implementation of a Memorandum of Understanding with the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA)- Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment Program.
· The DOR is collaborating with the Governors Committee on Employment of Persons with Disabilities to identify needs and service gaps for returning veterans with disabilities. These recommendations will be forwarded to the Governor annually.
· The DOR will continue to coordinate services for persons with developmental disabilities with the DDS for each of the 14 DOR districts and 21 DDS funded Regional Centers.
· The DOR will track and determine Autism Spectrum Disorders consumers needs through SEP/WAP liaison meetings, collaborative partnership communications, and regular contact with Autism Spectrum Disorder stakeholders.
· The DOR will continue using two core trainings on early intervention for students to enhance partner knowledge and expertise around effectively serving the Autism Spectrum Disorders population.
· The DOR will ensure that Rehabilitation Counselors have the necessary tools and resources to effectively serve expected caseload growth from individuals with autism spectrum disorders.
· The DOR and California Department of Mental Health are working collaboratively to more effectively serve the needs of individuals with ATBI.
· In conjunction with the Electronic Records System rollout, the DOR will continue to monitor its caseload as it relates to ethnicity, particularly for Hispanic and Asian American populations.

Utilizing ARRA funding:
· The Staff Development Section will coordinate, facilitate and/or provide necessary training to educate counselors and supervisors in medical aspects of Autism. The goal of this training is to improve staffs knowledge and abilities to better serve potentially unserved or underserved consumers.
· The DOR will provide VR counselors with equipment and resources to work in remote underserved locations to improve access to services for DOR consumers and employers.

4.11(d)(1)(C): Strategies for the plan of the state for establishing, developing or improving community rehabilitation programs.

The Community Resource Development (CRD) unit and Collaborative Services Section of the DOR work with Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRPs) and the DOR districts to ensure services provided by community partners address the needs of the DOR consumers.

· The DOR supports CRPs by providing training to CRP staff and evaluating the DOR Service Delivery system.
· The DOR partners with CRPs in building collaborative relationships with employers and businesses.
· The DOR supports the participation of CRP staff in training opportunities with a rehabilitation emphasis, such as; DOR/Department of Mental Health Customized Employment Partnership training series, Social Security Work Incentives, Disability Access, and through coordination of accreditation training through the national accrediting body of the Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF).
· The DOR provides and analyzes data to evaluate CRP service delivery trends and performance that will guide the DOR in its strategic plan for determining where service gaps and needs exist. Assists DOR District staff in providing monitoring tools to assist in the evaluation of CRP efficiencies.
· If resources permit, the DOR will also use the findings to determine the scope of the next establishment grant cycles to address the unmet needs of individuals with disabilities.
Utilizing ARRA funding:
· The DOR will replace the outdated CRD Database. The new database will provide the DOR with a methodology for tracking provider performance data; will be web enabled to allow consumers to rate CRPs and view other consumer ratings to facilitate informed choice; and will allow for a seamless transition of information to the Electronic Records System.
· The DOR will administer a Request for Proposal process to award contracts to CRPs to offer VR services to unserved/underserved populations and to provide expanded and enhanced VR services to consumers.

4.11(d)(1)(D): Strategies to improve the performance of the state with respect to the RSA Evaluation Standards and Performance Indicators.

The DOR identified specific program goals and measurable objectives to highlight RSA Evaluation Standards and Performance Indicators 1.1, 1.2, 1.5 and 2.1. The DOR will continue to utilize effective strategies to monitor progress on all standards and indicators. These strategies include but are not limited to:
· Targeted Management Information System (TMIS) reports provided at District, Branch and counselor level,
· RSA evaluation standards and performance indicators Quarterly Reports provided to all DOR Management by Budgets and Fiscal Forecasting staff,
· Quarterly Order of Selection updates, and
· Monthly monitoring of high-cost, long-term cases.

4.11(d)(2)(C): Describe how the state agency will use these strategies to overcome identified barriers relating to equitable access to and participation of individuals with disabilities in the state VR services program and the state SE services program.

Although individuals with disabilities have not identified and presented to the DOR any major barriers to equitable access and participation in either the vocational rehabilitation services or supported employment services programs, the DOR has identified potentially unserved and underserved populations via the SNAP (see Attachment 4.11(a)). Some of the DOR preliminary data research suggests potential barriers, and this data will be further analyzed.

The following information sources were also reviewed to identify potential barriers: Consumer Satisfaction Survey results; Program Improvement Plan information; needs identified by EPSD and SSD staff; and caseload review analysis.

Many of the strategies identified in Attachment 4.11(d)(1)(B) aim to increase access for the potentially unserved and underserved populations.

During the current budget crisis, the DOR will be unable to substantively hire any additional staff. However, the department will be examining how to best allocate staff to carry out critical functions, and will continue to re-evaluate the current DOR vocational rehabilitation service delivery (VRSD) system to mitigate potential and identified barriers.

This screen was last updated on Sep 25 2009 3:20PM by Melyssa Adams

Screen 16 of 17

State Plan for the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program
and
State Plan Supplement for the State Supported Employment Services Program

California Department of Rehabilitation State Plan for Fiscal Year 2010 (submitted FY 2009)

Attachment 4.11(e)(2) Evaluation and Reports of Progress

Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) and Supported Employment (SE) Goals

The DOR is providing a report reflecting the progress toward achieving the goals and measurable objectives established for FFY 2008 (10/1/2007  9/30/2008).

Program Goal 1.1 Increase the Quality and Quantity of Employment Outcomes

Objective 1.1 The Department of Rehabilitation (DOR) will increase the number of employment outcomes and earnings ratios during FFY 2008.

Performance Measure to be achieved:
During FFY 2008, the DOR will increase employment outcomes by 1% over the FFY 2007 (FFY 2007 outcome times 1.01).
FFY 2007 Achieved: 13,282 outcomes
FFY 2008 Goal: 13,415 outcomes
FFY 2008 Achieved: 13,886 outcomes
This performance measure ties to Performance Indicator 1.1. The DOR met this goal (1.045%). Employment outcomes have been increased through the following strategies and collaborative efforts among DOR, employers, and stakeholders. Workforce Development Section (WDS) forwards job leads to District Employment Coordinators within each District. WDS forms relationships with the business community to receive job leads and, via website at www.dor.ca.gov/workplace, field staff conduct job fairs, job clubs, and refer consumers to on-line resources. Districts also conduct Job Placement Circle forums, which have been instrumental in providing collaborative networking opportunities for the consumers, district staff, community agencies, and local employers as well as providing public relations outreach for DOR services. Consumers utilize the OneStop services to assist with job search and placement.

Performance Measure to be achieved:
During FFY 2008, the DOR will increase the number of consumers who identify employment as their primary source of income at successful closure in competitive employment by 1% over FFY 2007 (FFY 2007 outcome times 1.01).
FFY 2007 Achieved: 10,084 consumers
FFY 2008 Goal: 10,185 consumers
FFY 2008 Achieved: 10,344 consumers
The DOR met this goal. The California minimum wage increased to $8.00 an hour in January 2008, which has allowed more consumers to rely less on public sources and other sources of support, and more on personal income as the primary source of support.
In addition, the DOR co-sponsors the "Disability Benefits 101" (DB101) website http://www.disabilitybenefits101.org/, which provides on-line, interactive benefits counseling to consumers. Field staff have also been provided access to DB101 training, which allows them to better educate consumers. Consumers educated on DB101 can make informed decisions about employment because they understand the impact of employment income on public benefits and therefore become increasingly willing to rely more on personal income as the primary source of support.

Performance Measure to be achieved:
During FFY 2008, the DOR will increase the earnings ratio of all individuals in competitive employment by 0.5% over FFY 2007 (FFY 2007 percent times 1.005) as evidenced by RSA Indicator 1.5.
FFY 2007 Achieved: 50.3%
FFY 2008 Goal: 50.55%
FFY 2008: 49.0%
The DOR did not meet this goal. It is recognized that there is a correlation between the amount of a states average wage and its earning ratio. Therefore, California has greater challenges in achieving its goal than do other states due to the extremely high wages within the entertainment and other high profile industries. In 2000, California had the sixth highest average wage at $19.81 per hour. In May 2008, the average wage reached $23.12 per hour in California. Furthermore, the minimum wage in California increased on January 1, 2008 to $8.00. However, due to the economic downturn, it has been more difficult for consumers to be placed in well-paying competitive employment above minimum wage. The earnings for both DOR consumers and all employed Californians increased in FY 2008 and the gap between has not decreased.

Program Goal 1.2 Increase the effectiveness and efficiency of DOR vocational rehabilitation services delivery

Objective 1.2 The DOR will increase efficiencies in Individual Plan for Employment (IPE) Development, effectively measure consumer satisfaction and evaluate current DOR service delivery system.

Performance Measure to be achieved:
During FFY 2008, 80% of eligible individuals able to be served will have their IPE developed within 90 days of date of eligibility determination or removal from the waiting list.
FFY 2008 Goal: 80%
FFY 2008 Achieved: 80.4%
The DOR met this goal. Field staff receive a monthly report and reminder for IPEs that are nearing development deadline. In addition, written guidance and training have been provided to field staff on timely IPE development.

Performance Measure to be achieved:
During FFY 2008, 80% of respondents to the Consumer Satisfaction Survey (CSS) will identify satisfaction with services provided during the following phases of service delivery:
· Preplan
· In Plan
· Closure, Employed
· Closure, Not Employed

FFY 2008 Goal: 80%
FFY 2008 73%
The DOR did not meet this goal. This was the first year that this particular CSS was administered, and therefore there was no baseline to determine a targeted percentage of satisfaction.

One question in all surveys represented a broad measure of satisfaction, I am satisfied with services from the Department of Rehabilitation. For this item, the Closure Employed group had the highest level of agreement with 81%, followed by the In-Plan group with 78%, the Pre-Plan group with 66%, and the Closure Not Employed group with 63%. Cumulatively, the respondents indicated either that they strongly agreed or agreed with this statement 73% of the time.

The CSS provided consumers an opportunity to submit written responses if there was anything that the DOR could have done to improve services to them. The DOR catalogued responses and provided them to appropriate personnel and to address these concerns. The nature of the ad-hoc responses, however, do not lend themselves to statistical analysis.

The data did not support an analysis of differences in satisfaction levels among the DORs fourteen districts. While the total number of responses for the survey was 690 consumers, once this number was divided among the four status groups, and then further partitioned by district, there were generally too few responses in most districts to provide a basis for making reliable district-by-district comparisons.

The findings of the survey should provide a useful basis for ongoing discussions of consumer satisfaction issues at the DOR and ongoing discussions between the DOR and SRC related to potential consumer satisfaction survey modifications in the future.

Performance Measure to be achieved:
During FFY 2008, the DOR will develop and implement a strategic plan to re-evaluate the current DOR Vocational Rehabilitation Service Delivery System (VRSD).
FFY 2008 Goal: VRSD Project Plan
FFY 2008 Achieved: 100% completed
The DOR met this goal. The DOR approved the strategic VRSD work plan in November 2007. Initial visioning activities have been completed and technical analysis of potential service delivery models are underway. Thorough Business Process Analysis of existing service delivery system began in April 2008 and is expected to be completed in FFY 2009.

Program Goal 1.3 The DOR will increase the number of SSI/SSDI beneficiaries at or above Substantial Gainful Activity (SGA)

Objective 1.3 The DOR will increase the number of DOR SSI/SSDI beneficiary consumers at or above SGA and will provide training and technical assistance to maximize access to and understanding of Social Security Administration (SSA) work incentives.

Performance Measure to be achieved:
During FFY 2008, the DOR will increase the number of SSI/SSDI
beneficiaries employed and earning at or above SGA by 2% over FFY 2007 (FFY 2007 outcome times 1.02).
FFY 2007 Achieved: 2,417 consumers
FFY 2008 Goal: 2,465 consumers
FFY 2008 Achieved: 2,307 consumers
The DOR did not meet this goal. Many consumers remain concerned about losing cash benefits, especially health benefits, particularly with the downturn in the economy. Despite recent changes to Social Security Work Incentive programs, consumers still choose to work below SGA, particularly those in the Title II (SSDI) program. The decision to work part-time, full time or above SGA level remains the consumer's informed choice.

Due to the economic downturn, many consumers compete for jobs that previously had fewer applicants.

Performance Measure to be achieved:
During FFY 2008, the DOR, with partners, will provide seven (7) training/technical assistance sessions for DOR staff, community partners, and other stakeholders related to the utilization of SSA work incentives, on-line benefits planning tools and calculators.
FFY 2008 Goal: 7 sessions
FFY 2008: 11 sessions
The DOR exceeded this goal. Eleven sessions were held at different locations throughout the state. Training objectives include providing substantive resource tools for rehabilitation counselors and service providers. Staff and service providers can better assist the consumer with making informed employment choices, and ultimately increasing the number of consumers that will enter the workforce. The DB 101 website, co-sponsored by DOR, was an instrumental tool used by counselors and service providers to better educate consumers.

Performance Measure to be achieved:
During PY 2008, DOR will administer a five-year Demonstration Project grant with SSA that will enroll 200 DOR consumers during Project Year Two and include the provision of intensive benefits planning and counseling for consumers with HIV or other autoimmune deficiencies.
FFY 2008 Goal: Administer Demonstration Project grant with SSA.
FFY 2008: Grant not administered.
The DOR did not meet this goal. On August 28, 2007, SSA informed DOR that funding would not continue into the current budget period. The grant was terminated as of September 29, 2007, prior to consumer enrollment.

Program Goal 1.4 The DOR will improve the recruitment and retention of Qualified Rehabilitation Professionals.

Objective 1.4: The DOR will establish an eligibility list of qualified rehabilitation professionals available to be hired within the newly established Senior Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor, Qualified Rehabilitation Professional (SVRC, QRP) classification.

Performance Measure to be achieved:
The DOR will develop and implement on-line continuous examination for the SVRC, QRP classification by October 1, 2007.
FFY 2008 Goal: On-line continuous exam
FFY 2008: 100 % completed
The DOR met this goal. Within the first seventeen days of implementation of the on-line continuous examination for the SVRC, QRP, 100 candidates had successfully completed the SVRC, QRP exam. DOR was successful in providing a larger and ongoing candidate pool for the SVRC, QRP job classification. The number of exam applicants increased from 298 in FFY 2006 to 772 in 2008 (a 268% increase). The resulting candidate pool increased from 117 in FFY 2006 to 487 in FFY 2008 (a 416% increase).

Performance Measure to be achieved:
The DOR will complete salary studies for the SVRC, QRP and related classifications by December 31, 2007.
FFY 2008 Goal: Salary Study completed
FFY 2008: Not completed in FFY 2008
The DOR did not meet this goal. All salary compensation study data have now been received by DOR from the contractor, Cooperative Personnel Services (CPS). The DOR utilized this compensation data to prepare for labor contract negotiations that occurred in FFY 2008. The DOR received the final, approved salary compensation study report from the CPS during spring 2009.
Program Goal 1.5 The DOR will increase equality for persons with disabilities through systems change.

Objective 1.5 The DORs Independent Living and Disability Access Sections (DAS) will support systems change activities.

Performance Measure to be achieved:
During FFY 2008, the DOR will assist 55 individuals with disabilities to transition from nursing facilities to community based living arrangements.
FFY 2008 Goal: 55 individuals
FFY 2008: 66 individuals
The DOR exceeded the identified goal. This performance measure is driven by the landmark 1999 U.S. Supreme Court case, Olmstead vs. L.C., which states that persons with disabilities must be permitted, whenever feasible, to live in their own communities rather than institutions.

Performance Measure to be achieved:
During FFY 2008, the DORs DAS will provide at least thirty (30) training sessions to California departments and agencies regarding employment law and architectural and program access.
FFY 2008 Goal: 30 training sessions
FFY 2008 36 training sessions
The DOR exceeded this goal. The DOR provided 36 training sessions on employment law, program access, disability awareness, and physical access to California State government entities.

During FFY 2008, 26 training sessions were conducted outside DOR and 10 training sessions were conducted within the DOR, for a total of 36 training sessions. In addition, 240 training sessions were conducted for the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR). Critical state access issues related to CDCR and a court injunction against CDCR led to DOR DAS reallocating resources to an Interagency Agreement (IA) with CDCR. The IA aimed to ensure that program and physical access needs for inmates were identified and addressed at all 33 institutions.

Performance Measure to be achieved:
During FFY 2008, the DOR will provide the Governors Offices of Emergency Services (OES) and Homeland Security recommendations and technical assistance to maximize the health and safety of all Californians with disabilities.
FFY 2008 Goal: Recommendations &
Technical assistance
FFY 2008: Completed
The DOR met this goal. During FFY 2008:
· The DOR developed and recommended guidance for the Governors OES to be provided to local governments on the utilization of disability transportation providers in evacuations and shelters.
· The DOR provided technical assistance to the Governors OES, in communicating with and assisting people with disabilities during severe cold and heat conditions throughout the state. This included drafting of Disability Needs in a Heat Contingency Plan.
· Three DOR staff members were deployed to assess and coordinate the needs of evacuees with disabilities in shelters during the major Southern California wild fires of October 2007.
· One DOR staff member provided mission tasking support at the OES state operations center during the major Southern California wild fires of October 2007.
· Two DOR staff members assisted the California Department of Social Services and Emergency Medical Services Authority with the development of guidance on sheltering people with disabilities. This guidance information is to be provided to mass care shelter operators.
· DOR provided technical assistance and accessibility training for the City of San Jose to survey a selected number of disaster shelters in their efforts towards accessibility for disaster shelters in the city.

 

Section II: Supported Employment (SE) Performance Goals for Title VI Part B Funds
SE Goal 2.1 Increase competitive, integrated employment opportunities for SE consumers

Objective 2.1 The DORs SE program will maximize access to competitive, integrated employment opportunities.

Performance Measure to be achieved:
During FFY 2008, the DOR will increase individual placements 2% (FFY 2007 percentage times 1.02) for those consumers receiving supported employment services over FFY 2007.
FFY 2007 Achieved: 68%
FFY 2008 Goal: 69.36%
FFY 2008 Achieved: 64.0%
The DOR did not meet this goal. Competition for jobs in California has increased due to the downturn in the economy and the increase in the minimum wage, both of which have led to decreased individual placements.

Performance Measure to be achieved:
During FFY 2008, the DOR will increase competitive wages for consumers receiving SE services by 2.5% over FFY 2007.
FFY 2007 Achieved: $6.84
FFY 2008 Goal: $7.01
FFY 2008 Achieved: $7.10
The DOR met this goal. Currently, the DOR has exceeded the identified goal of $7.01 per hour. Inflation suggests that this trend will not continue in 2009. Californias minimum wage increased 6.7% effective January 1, 2008, to $8.00 per hour.

SE Goal 2.2 Enhance staff knowledge of SE regulations by providing training and technical assistance to staff

Objective 2.2 The DORs SE staff will have necessary tools and technical assistance.
Performance Measures to be achieved:
During FFY 2008, the DOR will promulgate SE Regulations.
FFY 2008 Goal: Promulgation of Regulations
FFY 2008 Outcome: Incomplete
The DOR did not meet this goal. The state budget impasse and staffing reductions impeded timely completion of SE regulations. Submission of draft SE regulations to the OAL is currently expected in February 2010, dependent upon available staff resources, after review by California Health and Human Services Agency and Department of Finance.

Performance Measure to be achieved:
During FFY 2008, the DOR will publish Rehabilitation Administrative Manual (RAM) Chapter 31: Supported Employment Program Manual
FFY 2008 Goal: Publication/Dissemination
FFY 2008: 100% completed
The DOR met this goal. The DOR published RAM Chapter 31, Supported Employment Program Manual on February 22, 2008. Training for DOR staff is expected in FFY 2009.

Performance Measure to be achieved:
The DOR will coordinate and implement at least two regional Supported Employment Coordinator Meetings during PY 2008.
FFY 2008 Goal: 2 regional SE Meetings completed
FFY 2008 Achieved: 2 regional SE Meetings held
The DOR met this goal. Two SEP/WAP liaison teleconference meetings were held on May 15, 2008 and June 3, 2008. Additionally, collaborative quarterly meetings between the DOR and the California Department of Developmental Services were established, beginning in December 2007.

Performance Measure to be achieved:
During FFY 2008, the DOR will develop and implement electronic resources to provide technical assistance to staff and community partners during FFY 2008.
FFY 2008 Goal: Develop and implement electronic resources
FFY 2008 Achieved: Completed
The DOR met this goal. The DOR statewide SE coordinator has completed 76 discussion forum posts and 42 electronic bulletin board posts. The posts include DOR communication, such as memoranda, letters, and program updates. The electronic posts are accessible by DOR staff. The DOR will continue to identify opportunities for continuous improvement of the technical tools and resources provided to DOR staff.

SE Goal 2.3. Promote and enhance collaboration with local and statewide SE partners and stakeholders
Objective 2.3 The DOR will collaborate with SE partners and stakeholders to maximize opportunities for applicants and eligible individuals accessing supported employment services.

Performance Measure to be achieved:
During FFY 2008, the DOR will develop a formal information-sharing network of DOR Supported Employment Program/Work Activity Program (SEP/WAP) liaisons to be resources to Regional Centers, district staff and community partners (including Mental Health Agencies) related to policy and practices.
FFY 2008 Goal: Establish formal network
FFY 2008 Achieved: Completed
The DOR met this goal. The DOR SE network membership has been identified and a communication system developed. Membership includes SEP/WAP Liaisons, SEP Specialists, VR/WAP Specialists, Account Technicians, and Regional Center Habilitation Liaisons lists as needed. As appropriate, internal stakeholder lists are utilized including District Administrators, Rehabilitation Supervisors, Office Services Supervisors.

Additionally, the DOR collaborates with mental health agencies to provide SE services to consumers in mental health programs (see Attachments 4.8(b)(1) and 4.8(b)(2)).

Performance Measure to be achieved:
During FFY 2008, the DOR will identify and disseminate best practices for SE service delivery via the SEP/WAP liaisons.
FFY 2008 Goal: Best Practices Bulletin Board Update
FFY 2008 Achieved: Completed
The DOR met this goal of updating best practices bulletins for use by all supported employment professionals statewide. Seventeen emails regarding updates and best practices were sent to the SEP/WAP liaisons in FFY 2008. The DOR is seeking all opportunities to disseminate effective technical tools and resources. Due to the downturn in the economy, it is difficult to differentiate the benefits of the best practices bulletins. Staff have identified that efficient access to this information is helpful to their service delivery.

 

As of February 2009, the DOR passed RSAs Evaluation Standards and Performance Indicators for FFY 2008 and will utilize the substantive strategies outlined in Title I and Title VI B program goals to continue to improve performance during FFY 2009.

Indicator 1.1: Change in Employment Outcomes
RSA Definition: The difference between the number of individuals exiting the VR program who achieved an employment outcome during the current performance period and the number of individuals exiting the VR program who achieved an employment outcome during the previous performance period.
DOR Results: The DOR passed this indicator. RSA requires that employment outcomes equal or exceed previous performance. For FFY 2008, there were 13,886 employment outcomes, whereas in the prior FFY 2007, there were 13,282 employment outcomes, a gain of 604 employment outcomes.

Indicator 1.2: Percent of Employment Outcomes
RSA Definition: The percentage of individuals exiting the program during the performance period who have achieved an employment outcome after receiving services.
DOR Results: The DOR did not pass this indicator. In FFY 2008, for those individuals who exited the DOR vocational rehabilitation program after receiving services, DOR successfully assisted 45.2% of them to achieve an employment outcome. The figure is lower than the RSA-required 55.8% given that the unemployment rate in California increased from 5.4% to 7.5% from October 1, 2007 to September 30, 2008. In addition, the DOR was engaged in major personnel initiatives during the fiscal year as part of the Comprehensive System of Personnel Development.

Indicator 1.3: Competitive Employment Outcomes
RSA Definition: This measures the percentage who exit the VR program in employment in integrated settings with or without ongoing support services, self-employment, or BEP employment with hourly rate of earnings equivalent to at least the federal or state minimum wage rate, whichever is higher, based on all the individuals exiting the program who have achieved an employment outcome after receiving services.
DOR Results: The DOR passed this indicator. Of all individuals determined to have achieved an employment outcome, 86.9% exited the vocational rehabilitation program in competitive or self-employment with earnings equivalent to at least the minimum wage. This percentage, which is higher than the RSA-required 72.6%, reflects the DORs strong emphasis on Program Goal 1.1 (Increase the quality and quantity of employment outcomes) and informed choice of our consumers.

Indicator 1.4: Significance of Disability
RSA Definition: The percentage of those individuals identified in Indicator 1.3 who have significant disabilities.
DOR Results: The DOR passed this indicator. Of all individuals who exit the vocational rehabilitation program in competitive or self-employment with earnings equivalent to or at least the minimum wage, 99.9% were individuals with significant disabilities, which far exceeds the RSA requirement of 62.4%. Since 1995, the DOR has operated its vocational rehabilitation services program under an Order of Selection (OOS) process. As noted in Attachment 4.11(c)(3), Order of Selection, the DOR expects to continue the OOS process throughout FFY 2009 and FFY 2010.

Indicator 1.5: Earnings Ratio
RSA Definition: The ratio of the average hourly earnings of all individuals in competitive employment to the average hourly earnings of all employed individuals in the state.
DOR Results: The DOR did not pass this indicator. The DOR achieved a ratio of 0.49, which did not meet the RSA-required ratio of 0.52, due to the very high average hourly wage within the State ($22.64). The earnings for both DOR consumers and all employed Californians increased in FY 2008 and the gap between has not decreased.

Indicator 1.6: Self-Support
RSA Definition: For those identified in Performance Indicator 1.3, the difference in the percentage of individuals who at program entry reported their income as the largest single source of support, and the percentage that reported their personal income as the largest single source of support at program exit.
DOR Results: The DOR passed this indicator with 69.9%, succeeding the RSA requirement of 53%. The success reflects the commitment to outreach to individuals who require services in order to obtain employment.

Indicator 2.1: Minority Background Service Rate
RSA Definition: The ratio of the percent of individuals with a minority background to the percent of individuals without a minority background exiting the program who received VR services.
DOR Results: The DORs ratio of .99 is above the RSA-required 0.80 ratio, and reflects DORs commitment to the rich diversity of California.

 

Innovation and expansion activities for FFY 2008

Section III: Innovation and Expansion

Innovation and Expansion Goal 3.1: Electronic Records System (ERS)

Objective 3.1 The DOR has set aside a portion of funds allotted under Section 110 of the Act to replace its outdated mainframe system with a new ERS. The new ERS will be a commercial off-the-shelf application that will improve accessibility, effectiveness and efficiency of the VR services program for individuals with disabilities.

Performance Measure to be achieved:
During FFY 2008, the DOR will release the Request for Proposal (RFP) by October 2007.
FFY 2008 Goal: RFP Release by October 2007
FFY 2008: Not Completed
The DOR did not meet this goal. The DOR released the ERS RFP in January 2008. The RFP release was delayed due to unavoidable budget delays during summer 2007.

Performance Measure to be achieved:
The DOR will select the ERS vendor by June 2008.
FFY 2008 Goal: Vendor selection by June 2008
FFY 2008: Vendor selected January 2009
The DOR did not meet this goal as prescribed in June 2008. However, the DOR issued an Intent to Award on December 19, 2008 to the selected vendor, Alliance Enterprises, Inc. Vendor selection was announced January 2009. Vendor selection was consequently delayed due to unavoidable budget delays during summer 2007.

Performance Measure to be achieved:
The DOR will obtain state approval to award a contract to an ERS vendor by August 2008.
FFY 2008 Goal: Contract Award by 8/2008
FFY 2008: Not yet completed
The DOR did not meet this goal. Unavoidable state budget delays during summer 2007 delayed DOR from obtaining state approval to award a contract by August 2008. However, state approval was granted on April 1, 2009.

Innovation and Expansion Goal 3.2: Establishment Grants

Innovation and expansion activities for State Fiscal Year (SFY) 2007-08*

*The DOR awards E-grants on the SFY cycle (July 1  June 30). As such, the following information is reported over SFY cycles.

The DOR has historically set aside $4,000,000 annually to establish, develop and improve services to VR consumers through the use of Establishment Grants (E-Grants) to Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRP). In SFY 2004-05, this amount was reduced to $2,000,000 and the funds redirected to other DOR programs and services. E-Grant funds can only be used to support CRP staffing and/or equipment costs necessary to provide direct consumer services. E-Grant recipients must provide a (non-federal) cash match in the amount of 21.3% of the total budget. E-Grants are initially awarded for a 36-month period, with the potential to be extended for an additional 12 months.

In SFY 2007-08, Community Resource Development (CRD) encumbered $487,712 to continue funding 22 E-Grants, which were in their second year and entering the third year funding period. Nine (9) of the 22 grantees opted not to seek additional grant funding after the third year. Of those nine (9) CRPs not seeking additional grant funding, four (4) are providing services through the new Uniform Fees for Service (UFS) structure implemented in March 2009; two (2) were wrapped into existing Mental Health contracts providing assurances of service continuation under the cooperative contract mechanism; and one (1) continues services through the State Price Schedule for disability related products and services administered by the California Department of General Services. The remaining two (2) providers have discontinued services due to an inability to fiscally sustain the program because of a lack of referrals.

Active E-Grants:
12 of the 13 currently active grants will conclude four years of funding on January 14, 2010. The final grantee concludes funding on May 14, 2010. It is projected that services will continue under the UFS structure.

This screen was last updated on Sep 28 2009 12:27PM by Melyssa Adams

Screen 17 of 17

State Plan for the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program
and
State Plan Supplement for the State Supported Employment Services Program

California Department of Rehabilitation State Plan for Fiscal Year 2010 (submitted FY 2009)

Attachment 6.3 Quality, Scope, and Extent of Supported Employment Services

The Department of Rehabilitation (DOR) provides the full scope of Supported Employment (SE) services to those Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) eligible individuals with the most significant disabilities, who are in a priority category currently being served under Order of Selection, require extended services to maintain employment, and have at least a reasonable expectation that a source of extended services will be available at the time of transition. SE includes, if necessary, situational assessments through trial work experiences (TWE) to assess the individuals interests and abilities. TWE is also used to determine the techniques best suited to assist the individual to learn the work skills and the work behaviors necessary for employment.

The DOR provides those services that facilitate successful job matches and lead to successful job placements, primarily through community rehabilitation programs (CRPs), educational institutions and county mental health providers. In areas where provider organizations are not available, or an individual has needs beyond those that can be met by a CRP, an individual service provider approved by the district to provide job placement or job coaching services may be authorized. In order to ensure quality services, the DOR Community Programs, Support and Development Section (CPS&D) has developed strategies that include but are not limited to:
· Service specification guidelines
· Training and technical support through Community Resource Development Specialists housed within the field throughout the state
· DOR Certification and CARF Accreditation of community rehabilitation programs
· Ongoing assessment and evaluation of end users

Consumers of SE services actively participate in a comprehensive assessment to identify quality employment outcomes that meet the individuals strengths, resources, priorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, interests and informed choice. This comprehensive assessment, when appropriate, includes trial work experiences, to provide the individual with an opportunity consider multiple jobs, environments, settings, and tasks. The DOR, as appropriate, has benefits planning discussions with the consumer and other interested parties to identify both appropriate work incentive programs as well as sources for ongoing support for job coaching and ancillary services. During Federal Fiscal Year 2009, the DOR established a Social Security Program Section to efficiently and effectively disseminate information and provide technical assistance related to work incentive programs.

Once an appropriate supported employment position is identified for an individual, the DOR provides supported employment job coaching services for a period up to 18 months. The services can be extended beyond 18 months, when appropriate, upon agreement of the consumer and counselor. The job coaching services vary from one-to-one support on the job, to one-to-eight support on the job when individuals with disabilities are working together in a small group in the community. Job coaching services may also be provided off the job as necessary when working with employers, care providers, advocacy groups, or in the provision of other services necessary to assist the individual in maintaining employment. The VR Program funds Job coaching until the individual is determined to be stable and has maintained that stability for at least 60 days.

Once the individual has maintained stability on the job for at least 60 days, the funding for, or provision of, job coaching transitions to the extended services provider. The Senior Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor (SVRC) continues to track the individuals progress and job stability during the transition period. If the individual maintains stabilization for 60 days after transition to extended services, the case is closed successfully.

Sources of extended services for SE consumers are detailed in Attachment 4.8(b)(4) Evidence of Collaboration Regarding Supported Employment and Extended Services.

This screen was last updated on Sep 24 2009 6:35PM by Melyssa Adams

According to the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, no persons are required to respond to a collection of information unless it displays a valid OMB control number. The valid OMB control number of this information collection is 1820-0500. The time required to complete this information collection is estimated to average 25 hours per response, including the time to review instructions, search existing data sources, gather the data needed, and complete and review the information collection. If you have any comments concerning the accuracy of the time estimate or suggestions for improving this form, please write to: U.S. Department of Education, Washington, D.C. 20202-4760. If you have any comments or concerns regarding the status of your individual submission of this form, write directly to: Carol Dobak, Chief of the Vocational Rehabilitation Program Unit, Rehabilitation Services Administration, U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue S.W., PCP, Room 5014, Washington, D.C. 20202.